Author Topic: Getting a dog  (Read 1578 times)

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2010, 03:30:09 PM »
Big +1 on the crate.
I've had dogs all my life, but the first time I used a crate was with my current dog (now 6 years) old. It has been a life saver. She adapted to it very quickly, and it made house training very easily. More importantly, she's had a couple of surgeries, torn front leg, blown out back knee joint. Keeping her quiet would have been a nightmare without the crate, easy with it. It's a safe, secure place for her and she likes going in it. Good for travel, etc.

Mark Tumarkin
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Offline andrew

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2010, 05:09:11 PM »
I have a Siberian Husky (almost 2) and a 3 year old son. They play like brothers. He's crate trained, but still very mischievous. I have had a Black Lab too, and think that the labs are more obedient, but still just as hyper, and at times I think the dog listens more than the kid, and it was definitely easier to potty/house train. Me and the wife try to take the dog out every day for a long walk, but what he really likes to do is to run. Sometimes I just put on the harness and let him pull me on the bike which is sometimes dangerous to say the least.


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Offline Kaiser

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2010, 07:06:54 PM »
I decided to get a DNA test done by a reputable lab.

What lab did you use?

We are also thinking about getting a DNA test, but I read a lot of bad reviews about the economy DNA tests which is why we haven't bought any of those yet.

A crate is definitely a very useful tool. Our dog doesn't mind the crate at all and we try to limit the time he spends in there. But he's still not behaved enough to roam the house unsupervised.

Kai

Offline bluesman

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2010, 07:14:52 PM »
I'm a firm believer in the use of crate training as well.  My dog trainer convinced me to use one and it was the best thing I could have ever done for my dog along with alot of love. 

My lab absolutely loves his crate. It gives him a sense of security. Once he was potty trained we decided to leave it up for him since he liked it so much. We just leave the door open and he comes and goes as he pleases.

Even our Yorkiepoo likes it. It's an X-large crate so both dogs will fit in it, and from time to time I find them both napping in it.
They are a riot.

My dogs also love to hang out with me in the garage while I brew. They are trained to stay away from the burners.
True brew dogs at heart.  8)
Ron Price

Offline Tim McManus

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2010, 08:37:17 PM »
I have two rescues, both were puppies from different shelters about a year apart in age.

Here are some suggestions:

If you are looking for a trainer, find one that trains you how to handle the dog, not one that trains and handles the dog.  When the trainer leaves, you want to make sure the dog is trained to your voice and knows you are in charge.  All too often I see people hiring trainers who come to the house, train the dog, and then leaves the owners with a dog that still misbehaves.  YOU need to be trained how to train your dog.  I have never trained a dog with food and don't recommend it.  The dog's reward for behaving should be praise, not food.  Otherwise, the dog may not respond to training without food.

Crate training works very well, and I will do it again.  However, one of our rescues didn't respond well to crate training.  It wasn't until I let him roam around a room did he start feeling comfortable.  You need to build up trust with your dog, this is critically important.  You need to trust him and he needs to trust you.

Buy Nylabones if you are getting a puppy.  Puppies and adolescent dogs chew everything.  Nylabones are artificial bones made from nylon that dogs can chew on.  Leave them around where your dog can find them.  If you see you dog chewing on something they shouldn't be, reprimand them and give them a Nylabone with praise once they start chewing it.  Eventually they'll learn what's theirs to chew and what isn't.

And most importantly:  CONSISTENCY!  Dogs are creatures of structure, order, and routine.  They need to know where they rank in your pack (at the bottom, below the humans).  They need to know the rules and what peoples' actions mean.  Everyone needs to praise the dog in the same manner and reprimand the same way too.  They dog needs to be called the same name by everyone also.  After you establish these routines, your dog will become relaxed and grow into being a good dog.

We had our dogs before we had kids.  They have been a dream to everyone!

See as many dogs as possible before choosing one.  Best of luck with your search, but like some of the other folks have recommended, adopt from a local shelter.
Tim McManus
Haskell, NJ

Offline akr71

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2010, 07:00:36 AM »
I should also mention that if you happen to live close to water, your lab will always be wet.

 LOL!  Yes, definitely.  We have a bird sanctuary near our house that we take ours to - if there's any game he loves more than fetch, its fetch in water.

Yes, I realize the irony of taking a retriever to a wetlands "bird sanctuary."
Andy

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Offline weithman5

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2010, 07:11:09 AM »
I have two standard poodles (and no, they are not shaved and prissy),  one now has three legs due to bone cancer.  they are great dogs.  one was about 6 months old when we got him from a shelter and was nearly potty trained.  the other a little more work since we got her younger.  remember as puppies they like to bite and nip to get you to play. my wife hated that and thought the dog was being aggressive.  they also teethe like human babies.
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Offline dean

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2010, 07:17:50 AM »
One of the most gentle dogs is a lab, but they are pure hell for the first 2-3 years. Very mischievous.

Whatever you do, please rescue one from the shelter, rather than buy from a store which gets them from puppy mills.

Both Labs and Retrievers are this way.  I'm too impatient and won't wait for a dog that long to get over its "teen years".  I bought a 9 week old pup for my wife because she always wanted one.... never again will such a dog grace our property.  He tore out the bottoms of our privacy fence, dug holes... always into something.  I finally ended up giving the dog to a family near Lake Michigan having more property than us as well as kids... they loved him the first few months... haven't heard back from them since so maybe he did well with them.

Get a mutt, there a plenty of them around and most are smarter than any purebred.  Show your wife a pug puppy and its a done deal... she'll be putting bows and sweaters on it in no time.   ::)

Offline dbarber

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2010, 07:23:26 AM »
I have 3 goldens now and they are wonderful with children.  If you want to get an older dog and have your heart set on a golden i would check with state golden retriever rescues, just about every state has one.  

If you do decide to go the puppy route then get one from either a shelter or a reputable breeder.  There are a lot of backyard breeders who may have AKC registered dogs, but have not done many of the health clearances, particularly some of the genetic diseases.  Also, if you get a pup you should definitely crate train them, I crate trained all of mine and it didn't take long, just a lot of patience.  Be sure to read this book by the Monks of New Scete http://www.amazon.com/Art-Raising-Puppy-Monks-Skete/dp/0316578398/ref=pd_sim_b_1 and do as they suggest.

Yes, puppies are a handful, particularly for the first year or two, but with a lot of exercies and patience it is worth it.
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Offline dean

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2010, 07:29:55 AM »
Also, you've got to remember... most dog breeds were created for a specific purpose and even though you may get a pup which is several generations removed from that purpose... the pup may still carry some of those traits.   True it most in all likelyhood it won't be a natural for that purpose but it will most likely exhibit something specific to the breed and it may be something of a nuisance depending on your situation.

So if its just a companion type housepet... look at something appropriate and both you and your wife will be much happier.  Pugs are great, I'd strongly recommend you and your wife spend a little time with someone that raises them.  I think you'll go home with one if they have any pups.   I've never heard of one biting... though they do put on a good show sometimes.   :D   ;)
 
jmo....

Offline phillamb168

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2010, 07:38:49 AM »
Also, you've got to remember... most dog breeds were created for a specific purpose and even though you may get a pup which is several generations removed from that purpose... the pup may still carry some of those traits.   True it most in all likelyhood it won't be a natural for that purpose but it will most likely exhibit something specific to the breed and it may be something of a nuisance depending on your situation.


Yup, that's part of my reasoning for a Golden. I want a buddy for my duck blind on the Normandy marshes.

For crating, I'm definitely going to do that, as every single Golden owner I've ever talked to has said that a crate is invaluable.

I've asked SWMBO to write up a list of reasons why she likes the idea of getting a dog and why she dislikes the idea of getting a dog. I'll post those as soon as I get them and we'll see where we go from there I guess.

Re mutts, the problem is, my wife really only likes the way Goldens look. Any other dogs and she gets grossed out. This may be a matter of training, of course.... We'll see.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2010, 07:39:11 AM »
Also, no sig change at post #200? Lame!
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2010, 07:39:54 AM »
I have two rescues, both were puppies from different shelters about a year apart in age.

Here are some suggestions:

If you are looking for a trainer, find one that trains you how to handle the dog, not one that trains and handles the dog.  When the trainer leaves, you want to make sure the dog is trained to your voice and knows you are in charge.  All too often I see people hiring trainers who come to the house, train the dog, and then leaves the owners with a dog that still misbehaves.  YOU need to be trained how to train your dog. 

And most importantly:  CONSISTENCY!  Dogs are creatures of structure, order, and routine.  They need to know where they rank in your pack (at the bottom, below the humans). 

Two very good points.

The training is only as good as the trainer.  You must be trained before the dog can be trained.  I've seen dogs go to doggie boot camp to be trained only to come back home and be totally confused as the dog owner wasn't properly trained and all that time, effort and money goes down the drain.

...and consistenct, consistency and consistency. Oh and did I forget to mention consistency.
Dogs respond well to regimen...just like humans do.  8)

Good Luck!
Ron Price

Offline jeffy

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #28 on: December 07, 2010, 08:14:04 AM »
Also, no sig change at post #200? Lame!
It's 250.  bouef
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Offline Tim McManus

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #29 on: December 07, 2010, 04:22:13 PM »
Re mutts, the problem is, my wife really only likes the way Goldens look. Any other dogs and she gets grossed out. This may be a matter of training, of course.... We'll see.

You should look around.  There are many dog faces to be seen.  Here's a picture of one of my mutts (my wife "scarfed" the dog at Thanksgiving, but chicks dig this sort of thing).  This b!tch is hot!



Tim McManus
Haskell, NJ