Author Topic: Mead Aging Question  (Read 2961 times)

Offline justenpelton

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Mead Aging Question
« on: December 08, 2010, 06:21:57 PM »
I am new to mead making (and the AHA forum),  I have a couple of mead aging questions.  Will a mead age the same in a keg (under slight pressure) as it would in a glass carboy?  What temps are the best for aging meads, would temps of the mid-forties be too cool when it comes to aging meads or would meads benefit more from aging at cellar temps (50-54)? I was also wondering about racking off the lees as it settles, I fermented using Lalvin 71B-1122.

Thanks in advance!

Offline BrewArk

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2010, 11:44:54 PM »
I am new to mead making (and the AHA forum),  I have a couple of mead aging questions.  Will a mead age the same in a keg (under slight pressure) as it would in a glass carboy?  What temps are the best for aging meads, would temps of the mid-forties be too cool when it comes to aging meads or would meads benefit more from aging at cellar temps (50-54)? I was also wondering about racking off the lees as it settles, I fermented using Lalvin 71B-1122.

Thanks in advance!

Can't answer directly - I've only fermented mead in glass.  I'd expect it to be just fine in stainless.  I age my meads in my garage @ ambient temps.  What I do is ferment to dry, add sorbate & wait a week, add bentonite and let the lees settle (pretty neat to see the clarity change here), back-sweeten to taste, a couple of campden tablets, overnight & bottle.

So far I'm happy w/the batches I've made.  Straight meads w/no fruit.  :)
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Offline beerrat

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2010, 11:11:15 AM »
At the advice of some folk on this forum, I've begun to age my meads in stainless kegs, as I was having an issue with evaporation.  The dehumidifer drinks my meads in carboys. ;-)

The layer of CO2 under a little pressure to seal the keg protects from O2 also.

After primary fermentation, I rack off the the lees, into the keg.  Store in cellar with temp ranges from 59-90F during the year.  At some point I'll add clarifiers, like super kleer, wait per directions plus whatever time I feel like, and then rack to new keg for more aging or bottling.

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2010, 11:24:51 AM »
Aging is best done at cellar temps - beer or mead. The cooler temps are best for beer you want to keep fresh and drink young. Most meads, and many bigger beers, will benefit from aging. Do this at cellar temps. If this is not easily achieved, ambient temp in a home is ok, though not the best option. I keep my 'vintage' cellar in a closet. Try to keep at as constant a temp as possible. Wide temp swings are to be avoided if at all possible. I envy those with cellars. They're not common in FL.  Beouf
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Offline The Professor

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2010, 02:09:22 PM »
I always age my meads in glass carboys,at cellar temps,  for anywhere from 1-10 years.  I never age them in kegs, because I don't like any carbonation in my meads, not even a slight amount.  I suppose one could use a keg for long term aging, but I'd be careful to regularly bleed off the pressure that will inevitably build up over time.

I agree that mead should be aged at cellar temps, and not in a refrigerator cold environment.
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Offline kenschramm

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2011, 11:32:46 PM »
Mead will change at a slower pace if aged at temps in the 40's.  A consistent 50 - 62F will create the best environment for predictable aging.  I have not noted any significant difference between meads that are aging in glass vs aging in stainless under low pressure.  If you increase the pressure of meads under CO2 to levels that begin to induce carbonation, though, you do risk creating mead with a slightly reduced edge.
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Offline rossmartin24

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2011, 12:43:03 PM »
I don't like any carbonation in my meads, not even a slight amount.  .

I don't  know anything about Mead, so I looked over this recipe:  http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/MillenniumMeadRecipe

Is Mead typically carbonated?  This recipe calls for adding corn sugar when you bottle it, does that mean that this recipe is for a carbonated Mead?  Do you bottle the same as beer, with crown caps?

Sorry for the barrage of questions, I'm very intrigued by Mead and would like to have a go at it. 

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2011, 01:28:46 PM »
mead can be carbonated, still, or petillant (slight carbonation).... your choice and preference. most meads are still, but a highly carbonated mead can be like champagne. so yes, if the recipe calls for adding sugar at bottling, it would be for a carbonated mead.

most people bottle with crown caps, just like beer. some use corks. a few cork and cap (I always suspect they also wear belts and suspenders, possibly multiple of each).
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Mead Aging Question
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2011, 02:01:38 PM »
[Sorry for the barrage of questions, I'm very intrigued by Mead and would like to have a go at it. 

no need to apologize. I have been intrigued by mead since highschool. I made quite a few batches that turned out nasty back then and I always wonder now if I had let them age in the bottle for the last 15 years if they would have been amazing. Patience is an important watch word for mead. it can take years to mature. I have also seen recipes for mead that is drinkable in just a few weeks. the same rule applies as to other homebrewing RDWHAHB. I have made still meads, sweet meads slightly sparkling cysers (Mead with apple cider) and all sort of others. it is fun and it's fun to forget you have a case of something for a couple of years and then come across it again when cleaning out the closet or whatever.
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