Author Topic: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment  (Read 1134 times)

Offline Robert

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2018, 10:37:36 PM »
Thanks, joe_meadmaker.  I also have a lot of black patent (not to mention brown) left from my 1880 Whitbread Porter brewed on the 10th, which I plan to rebrew soon, but I still have plenty for color adjustment in other beers.  I'll try the cold steep added at 10 minutes, which  is just when I figured it should go in.  I want to do a pale ale with only the character of the  Chevallier,  but I want it to be a bit more amber than golden.  You know, "you eat with your eyes" sort of  thing.  If it works as I expect, it could be my go to colorant, when I don't want the flavor of crystal or dark sugar.

I did a search on "cold steeping black malt" and turned up a Brulosophy xBmt where they used this in a porter.  You might want to check that out.  (Results were favorable.)
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline joe_meadmaker

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2018, 11:26:06 PM »
I did a search on "cold steeping black malt" and turned up a Brulosophy xBmt where they used this in a porter.  You might want to check that out.  (Results were favorable.)

I saw that too.  Found it shortly after the cold steep idea was brought up.  It's definitely an encouraging result.

Offline Robert

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2018, 02:23:07 AM »
I used the cold steep method today.  For 6.5 gallons of 100% Chevallier pale malt wort, 1 oz of crushed black malt steeped almost 24 hours in 6-8 oz water, collected almost 6 oz of liquid. Slight aroma,  little flavor. Added at 10 minutes in the boil, it seemed to give just the color I hoped, about as calculated had the black malt been in the main mash; maybe up to 3° SRM, and the warm amber tint I wanted with no detectable flavor in the wort. 
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline joe_meadmaker

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2018, 06:07:36 PM »
Good to hear.  I can't wait to see a pic in the Recent Brews topic once the beer is done :)

Offline Robert

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2018, 03:31:05 AM »
I'll have to practice my photography skills then!  That topic always impresses me.   It's not easy to make beer look its best.   Especially as my good natural light is in the morning,  when I'm not drinking beer.

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Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Robert

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2018, 10:10:06 PM »
Thinking of trying a similar Burton Ale, but substituting D-90 for the No. 3 Invert.   If I do I'll report the results; sure would save time.

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Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline joe_meadmaker

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Re: Burton Ale grain bill adjustment
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2018, 04:50:04 PM »
substituting D-90 for the No. 3 Invert

Interesting idea.  I was also planning to try the Burton again with a variation of some kind.  A batch with Invert and another with Candi Syrup could make for a great back to back.

On my first run-through making Invert, there wasn't much of a time inconvenience (ignoring the part when the temperature was too low).  I was able to hit a sweet spot on my stove that kept the simmer even and steady.  So i was able to do prep, mash, etc. while the Invert was going.  And then just gave it a little stir anytime I was walking by.  I killed the heat some time during the boil and the sugar was ready to go in at the end.

All that being said, just having something ready to go would be much easier.

Update on my batch: I'm planning to rack it to a keg on Sunday.  So I'll get my first look at it since it went in to the fermenter.  I'm quite excited.