Author Topic: Mash Temps  (Read 1601 times)

beveragebob

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Mash Temps
« on: December 14, 2010, 05:41:20 PM »
For any given Ale excepting Belgians(145-148F), I usually mash around 152F with the logic, I'll get a medium body out of the brew but, and yes, I have calibrated my Mash temp gauge. The problem I've been having is my beers have been coming out so dry. I guess I'm treating my yeast too well. I'm going to start making my mash rot ~ 154F to get a bit more body in the mouth feel. Well, that's my rant for the day. Maybe this should be a sticky?(Brewing Rant for the day) We all have our gripes no matter how small. :-\

Offline euge

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2010, 05:48:08 PM »
Lately, when shopping for mashing thermometers I discovered 152 is still considered "dry". Usually 152 is my target because overly dextrinous beers are very unappealing to me. I may bump it up a degree or two as well.
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Offline denny

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2010, 05:54:37 PM »
I really wonder just how much difference a degree or 2 will make.  
« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 07:29:06 PM by denny »
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Offline gimmeales

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2010, 06:58:17 PM »
This is where I'd love to see an experiment in Zymurgy on mash temps and finished beer.  Identical recipes mashed at different temps up to like 160, using the same yeast, and do some taste-panel analysis.  Mash temp is only part of the equation in relation to the beer's finishing gravity and mouthfeel - yeast is huge here, I think. With something like US-05, even a 5-degree difference in mash temp may not be noticeable in the end. 

Maybe this has already been done in a past issue?

Offline blatz

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2010, 07:07:03 PM »
what yeast are you using?

1-2df would be hard to notice - probably needs to be 3 to really tell.  an experiment in Zymurgy would be cool hint, hint
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Offline ipaguy

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2010, 07:15:43 PM »
... I'm going to start making my mash rot ...
???  From listening to talks by Jamil Z. I get the impression that a 2F change in mash temp is significant.   
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Offline blatz

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2010, 07:16:51 PM »
rot = rule of thumb
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Offline denny

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2010, 07:28:47 PM »
... I'm going to start making my mash rot ...
???  From listening to talks by Jamil Z. I get the impression that a 2F change in mash temp is significant.   

And from my own experience, I think it's very minor.
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Offline Mikey

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2010, 07:33:21 PM »
For those that batch sparge, I can almost guarantee that after a few minutes you have variations of 1-2 degrees (or more) in different parts of the tun. Even if you initially stir a lot, corners, top surfaces, etc. are going to cool more quickly. Does it really matter? Not in my opinion.

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2010, 07:41:54 PM »
it doesn't matter whether you fly or batch sparge - the tun is the same  ;)
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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2010, 07:42:57 PM »
I don't think the type of sparge you do matters....most people will still have the situation you describe.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2010, 07:47:50 PM »
Here's the conversion chart from Palmer's book. There's a significant overlap between alpha and beta amylase. It appears to be between 146 and 156F.

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Offline tubercle

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2010, 08:00:44 PM »
Without constant stirring there is going to several degrees difference around the tun. Add that to +- tolerance with the thermometer then its going to very difficult to get everything with in a degree or two. Just relax.

 Tubercle just mixes grain to the appropriate temp water, stir for initial uniformity, close the lid and let it do its thing. Never made a bad beer.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2010, 08:23:12 PM »
Here's the conversion chart from Palmer's book. There's a significant overlap between alpha and beta amylase. It appears to be between 146 and 156F.
Think about it for a minute, what is the sprouting temperature for barley seeds?  Do they ever see 130F and live?  if they never do, then what is the genetic advantage to having an enzyme that is only active above that temperature?

In other words, the enzymes are active far below those ranges, otherwise they wouldn't be present in the barley.  They'll work slower and that may not be useful for brewing on a reasonable schedule, but those hard cutoff lines are just not realistic.  Think of them more as temperature ranges where that enzymatic activity is emphasized, not the only range where it will occur.
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Offline Mikey

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2010, 09:35:32 PM »
I don't think the type of sparge you do matters....most people will still have the situation you describe.

I used batch sparging as an example because it pretty much assumes that no supplemental heat is added to the tun. Fly sparging is likely the same way. I probably should have just specified mashing in a cooler.