Author Topic: Mash Temps  (Read 1900 times)

Offline Kaiser

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2010, 09:39:48 PM »
It has been my experience that FG correlates only loosly with mouthfeel. There have been many highly attenuated beers with a full mouthfell and poorly attenuated ones with thin mouthfeel. I expect that yeast plays a big role as well. The residual sweetness also depends more on residual fermentable sugars than on the actual FG.

Kai

Offline Mikey

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2010, 10:03:35 PM »
It has been my experience that FG correlates only loosly with mouthfeel. There have been many highly attenuated beers with a full mouthfell and poorly attenuated ones with thin mouthfeel. I expect that yeast plays a big role as well. The residual sweetness also depends more on residual fermentable sugars than on the actual FG.

Kai

I agree and I think personal preference is a really big part of the equation. Some people can drink beer up to 1.020 and enjoy it. I recently tapped a barley wine that finished out at 1.014 and I think it's too sweet. In fact, anything above this level seems sweet to me. In the case of my barley wine, I should have upped the hops, but that's for another thread.

Most of my beer finishes in the 1.010 to 1.012 range, generally on the lower side, and I think it has good mouth feel when I compare it to similar commercial styles.

Offline denny

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2010, 10:29:53 PM »
My BVIP recipe finishes at 1.026, but between the hopping level, the dark malts, and the bourbon it doesn't come across as sweet.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Mikey

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2010, 10:47:48 PM »
My BVIP recipe finishes at 1.026, but between the hopping level, the dark malts, and the bourbon it doesn't come across as sweet.

Without ever trying it, I couldn't say for sure, but my gut tells me that I would think it was cloyingly sweet.

Offline bonjour

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2010, 12:54:43 AM »
Some general information on Mash temps.  Attenuation is influenced by mash temps, and for different mash temps you can expect a different range.  This chart is an interpretation of attenuations in an infusion mash in Noonan’s book.  With a single infusion mash at 149F Noonan says an attenuation of 75-80% usually results.  This highlights the fact that to maximize attenuation we want to mash at the low end of this curve.
Fred Bonjour
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AHA Governing Committee; AHA Conference, Club Support & Web Subcommittees



Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline bluesman

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #20 on: December 15, 2010, 02:46:24 AM »
The residual sweetness also depends more on residual fermentable sugars than on the actual FG.
Kai

Yes. The sugars that remain after fermentaion are varied depending on what the yeast has metabolized. Do all yeasts behave the same as far as their sugar preference?

If we could analyze the residual sugars in a given batch of beer we would better understand how this mechanism affects the residual sweetness.
Ron Price

Offline Kaiser

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #21 on: December 15, 2010, 03:22:38 AM »
For those who haven't seen this yet, I experimented with different mash conditions and their effect on efficiency and wort fermentability. I never made real drinkable beer though since my primary goal was to get as many data points as possible: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php/Effects_of_mash_parameters_on_fermentability_and_efficiency_in_single_infusion_mashing#Temperature

The residual sweetness also depends more on residual fermentable sugars than on the actual FG.
Kai

Yes. The sugars that remain after fermentation are varied depending on what the yeast has metabolized. Do all yeasts behave the same as far as their sugar preference?


All brewers yeast can ferment the same set of sugars that is present in significant amounts in wort. Lager yeast can metabolize melibiose and raffinose while ale yeast can't. However neither of these sugars are present in wort in large enough concentrations that this difference matters.

All yeast can metabolize maltotriose. But some yeast are better at it than others. Maltotriose is the sugar that is consumed last and will also be the type of sugar that is left behind when the yeast stops before reaching the limit of attenuation.

Kai