Author Topic: funky taste after sitting in keg since summer  (Read 643 times)

Offline secretsquirrel

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 12
    • View Profile
funky taste after sitting in keg since summer
« on: December 19, 2010, 09:45:05 AM »
This summer, I took up kegging with a corny.  I kegged an Anchor Steam brew.  I did not store the keg in a fridge; rather, it stayed in my kitchen (outside in my garage) at temps from 65-80.  I tried some the other day and it tasted funky.  Really off from its tasty flavors after brewing and resting.
I thought that once beer was kegged and under pressure, it was good to go? Wrong info? Should I have kept it at a stable, cool temp? Loved to hear some thoughts on this.  Thanks
Squirrel

Offline beerocd

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1429
    • View Profile
Re: funky taste after sitting in keg since summer
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2010, 09:52:51 AM »
Carb it, chill it, drink it in the spring. Or add some fresh beer to it, or sour it, or wait 5 years and see it it's any better.
In any case you MUST drink it, it will reinforce why you should NOT do that to your beer ever again.  ;)
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline gordonstrong

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1355
    • View Profile
    • BJCP
Re: funky taste after sitting in keg since summer
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2010, 10:08:00 AM »
I thought that once beer was kegged and under pressure, it was good to go? Wrong info? Should I have kept it at a stable, cool temp? Loved to hear some thoughts on this.  Thanks
Squirrel

It is good to go.  Just like a bottle of beer.  If you treated a commercial beer that way, it likely would have had issues as well.  Imported beer often suffers because it was on a boat.  You just simulated part of the journey.

If your beer has some trace microbial action going on, keeping it warm will just encourage them.  Kegging helps it from going stale as fast, but it will still eventually stale.  Heat, light, mechanical agitation all encourage aging, as do frequent temperature swings.

Keeping it at serving temperature will encourage you to finish it faster.  Keeping it at fridge temperatures will help it remain stable longer.  Either one is preferable to just letting the keg sit around.

If the beer is now off, dump it.  Take apart your keg and give it a good PBW soak.  Scrub the serving tube, take apart the posts, remove the gaskets, inspect and clean everything.  Sanitize well, and then get back on the horse.  If you had a good beer, you can make it again.  Take care of it, and when it seems like it's losing something, take it to a party or something and encourage people to finish it.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 7646
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: funky taste after sitting in keg since summer
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2010, 12:21:00 PM »
Pull more beers off it and then see how it tastes. You might be getting some of what's settled out in the first glasses, and that can taste funky. It's better to keep them stable and cool as possible.

Had a similar problem recently.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline seajellie

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
    • View Profile
Re: funky taste after sitting in keg since summer
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2010, 07:33:17 PM »
As mentioned, the cooler and more stable you can keep it, the better. And if that means you have some cellar or basement space that is more stable and cooler then use that.

It can work. I rarely brew between May and mid-October, so during those months I'm drinking from kegs and bottles from batches made the previous winter (or even the one before that). I don't have cold space for all this and they spend lots of time in the cellar at 55 to 65, and those temps change very slowly.

There's definitely flavor change over this time but it's not bad at all usually (and sometimes, they improve).

Some general rules of thumb if you plan to do this: sanitation is super important; use CO2 to rack and avoid oxidation; try to get it below 60 and keep it there.