Author Topic: Prime Rib help needed  (Read 2251 times)

Offline roguejim

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Prime Rib help needed
« on: December 22, 2010, 09:00:40 PM »
Okay.  I have a 12lb bone-in, prime rib roast.  I need help gauging the time.

At 350, assuming I let the roast reach room temp before putting it in the oven, how long before it will reach an internal temp of 125F?  I'm shooting for med/rare.

My wife likes the way the the Sizzler Steak House gets a seasoned crust on the prime rib.  Is there a trick to achieving this?  I probably won't feel like experimenting this time, but down the road I will.  Thanks.

Offline johnf

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2010, 09:07:11 PM »
Okay.  I have a 12lb bone-in, prime rib roast.  I need help gauging the time.

At 350, assuming I let the roast reach room temp before putting it in the oven, how long before it will reach an internal temp of 125F?  I'm shooting for med/rare.

My wife likes the way the the Sizzler Steak House gets a seasoned crust on the prime rib.  Is there a trick to achieving this?  I probably won't feel like experimenting this time, but down the road I will.  Thanks.

Not been to Sizzler Steak House but the best prime rib preparation I have had has been at home following the method in Ad Hoc at Home by Thomas Keller. Basically you take a propane torch to the exterior and cook at 275 until done. This tends to take 2-3 hours for a 2-3 bone roast. It would obviously be longer for yours. This produces an excellent exterior crust.

At 350 for that size of roast you will have substantial non medium rare meat. That's what restaurants do since invariably some people will want it cooked thoroughly. I can't guess how long it will take but as always you should be using a thermometer.

Offline blatz

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2010, 09:15:13 PM »
another way to do it is to start off very hot (500df) for the first 30-45min and then tent the meat and turn the heat down.

I've used Ina Garten's recipe for the past 2 years and its been spot on.
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Offline riverrat

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2010, 10:23:07 PM »
assuming I let the roast reach room temp before putting it in the oven

It would take about a day for the roast to reach room temp sitting at room temp.  Some people recomend letting it sit out for around 2-3 hours to start warming up a bit.  Much longer than that is typically not recomended.

It is also fairly common to dry age the roast before cooking.  This is done by letting it sit uncovered in a very cold fridge (the closer to freezing, the better) for a period of time.  Three days seems to be a common recomendation, but there are people who will do this in excess of 45 days for a full rib roast.
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Offline Tim McManus

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2010, 11:15:23 PM »
How many bones or ribs are in it?

Dozens of ways to prepare this.  You can get Montreal seasoning and rub the outside of it to give it that Outback Steakhouse taste.

However, like most of the other folks said, cook it at a hot temperature initially.  This will roast the outside of the beef and cook it well.  This adds flavor (that nice dark, carmelly flavor) to the outside of the beef.  Slow cook the rest of it and use a quick read thermometer to ensure the inside is done to your liking.  You'll retain more moisture in the meat by slow cooking it over low heat.  You'll want to rotate the roast at least once during cooking to ensure that it doesn't dry out on one side.

Now carving it with the bone in is a treat if you've never done that before....
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jaybeerman

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2010, 12:28:28 AM »
From The River Cottage Meat Book - "However, it seems to me that it isn't just your guests who are honored by a roast.  So is the animal who has died to provide it...choosing a prime cut and roasting it seems to me a complimentary gesture.  It's like saying, "We may boil your shins in wine and make your kidneys into pies, but this fine, lean loin, with its chine and ribs and beautifully marbled meat, we will keep this whole, season it only with salt and pepper, roast it hot, serve it bloody, and think of you!"  :)

1. Shape and size depending, roast for 25-40 minutes (preheat oven) @ 425-450 (judge with a visual)
     when done open the door to the oven (30-60 seconds) to cool down to 325
2. He goes with 325 (rather than the conventional 350) for the slow cook after roasting
    watching for an Internal temp of 125 = Rare
3. REST THE MEAT at room temp or slightly above FOR NO LESS THAN A HALF HOUR cover with foil

He also highly recommends placing the roast in a roasting pan, not elevated.  If there's a such thing "extra" fat can be poured off as necessary.
Rough guess as to time would be 8-9 minutes per pound but SINCE YOUR CUT IS 12 POUNDS use the thermometer.  This method has always worked for me.  Cheers, j
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 12:40:31 AM by jaybeerman »

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2010, 01:45:08 AM »
Oh man, I love prime rib. I have been doing a lot of reading on the subject. I understand now that what most grocery stores call prime rib is not prime rib at all. It is choice rib at best. There are three grades of beef the best being Prime, (Ideal marbling and size) then there is Choice, (less marbling and maybe not the best size). And last there is Select. This will have no marbling and will be large from an old cow.

As other posters have said, I would consider using a thermometer. this is the only true way to measure the internal temp.

Dry aging is a great idea too. A real good way to do this is get a couple of clean white dish towels. Use good ones cause lint falls off the cheap ones. First lightly salt and run the rib with kosher salt or sea salt. Then Wrap the prime rib in the towel and place it on a a roaster pan (or something that will catch the blood) position it on a lower shelf in the fridge. Make sure the fridge is lower then forty. 36-38 is ideal. Then every day for a week take it out and un wrap the bloody towel and place it in the wash, Or sink wash it. Then wrap the beef with the clean towel. Keep changing out the towel every day. Before you cook it take a sharp boning knife and shave off a quarter inch layer from the entire roast surface the best you can. The longer you let it age the deeper the layer you will have to remove will be.

I put a little salt and pepper maybe some fresh rosemary.on mine and then lay it in the pan in such a way that the bones are above the meat. This will allow the juices and flavor from the bones and marrow to drip down over and through the meat while it cooks.

Through some butter on it too.

You gonna make Yorkshire pudding?
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jaybeerman

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2010, 04:15:32 AM »
You gonna make Yorkshire pudding?

If he does I'm gonna crash the party.

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2010, 05:42:23 AM »
Here is a good segment from Alton Brown.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmfaeWEjGpM
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2010, 07:16:17 AM »
Serious Eats JUST did a segment on Prime Rib: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/12/perfect-prime-rib-beef-recipe.html

Basically, set your oven to 150 and let it roast for about five hours. Then take it out and let it rest, and preheat your oven to 550. 10 minutes before serving, throw it back in the oven to let it get a lovely crust. But read the article, he does a better job of explaining it.
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Offline euge

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2010, 07:38:30 AM »
My Mother loved to do prime-rib for Christmas dinner. Yorkshire pudding and haricot vert with sliced almonds. Too old and tired now to do it.

Anyway, her roast was studded with slivered garlic cloves. I think this made it extra special. Nice and mid-rare with horseradish sour-cream sauce.
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Offline beerocd

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2010, 12:03:24 PM »
Every one of those ways sounded good. We crust ours with salt, pepper, parsley, and TONS OF GARLIC. Then spin it on a rotisserie(like the showtime). It's the best way I've ever had this cut of meat. It's all about the crust/bark.
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2010, 02:01:40 PM »
Serious Eats JUST did a segment on Prime Rib: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/12/perfect-prime-rib-beef-recipe.html

Basically, set your oven to 150 and let it roast for about five hours. Then take it out and let it rest, and preheat your oven to 550. 10 minutes before serving, throw it back in the oven to let it get a lovely crust. But read the article, he does a better job of explaining it.

This is more like how I do it. Low first then blast the hell out of it at the end. Cooks Illustrated did something on that awhile ago and it gave more evenly cooked meat. I'll have to check the Thomas Keller recipe too. I haven't made anything of his that wasn't amazing. Ad Hoc had a chicken thigh recipe that was great. Sort of same idea. Braise for tender meat then broil at end for crispy skin. Best of both worlds.

Christmas dinner is bone-in prime rib (prime grade, coleman's), Yorkshire puds, horseradish sauce and a bunch of other stuff that doesn't matter. Beer is good for most meals but this one screams for a claret (aged Bordeaux). Haven't picked one yet but I have a lot of Bordeaux in the cellar.

I agree. Roast until done. Use a thermometer but remember to stop 5 or so degrees under so it will finish with carryover cooking while it rests. You need to make the puds while the meat is resting anyway.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2010, 02:24:06 PM »
Oh and for GOD'S SAKE don't cook it past medium.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Prime Rib help needed
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2010, 02:49:46 PM »
Oh and for GOD'S SAKE don't cook it past medium.medium rare ;)
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