Author Topic: Schematic  (Read 3439 times)

Offline lazydog79

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2011, 02:38:43 PM »
I'd have to agree with the consensus here - KISS.  My setup is pretty rudimentary (here's a pic http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=640758&l=10df47a663&id=1077800222). 

It's nice to see someone else who uses saw horses in their brew setup.  ;D


Saw horses are great! I got a little fancy tho, and threw on a piece of plywood.  :D
http://www.flickr.com/photos/15193128@N02/5320733233/

Yup, that looks about right!  Plywood - never thought of that ;)

Offline denny

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2011, 03:41:16 PM »
Thanks again.
I checked out Denny's site and that does look pretty simple although it probably won't get me onto the Pimp my System page.  I guess it may be more important to actually brew beer than look good doing it.

Hey, YOU can look good even if the setup doesn't!  :)  I'm in it to brew beer, not to impress people with how shiny my setup is!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline kerneldustjacket

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2011, 04:47:48 PM »
Similar to sawhorses, I use one of those folding wheeled scaffolding set-ups.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1263552666831&set=a.1197312090858.2027612.1170159838


Hey, YOU can look good even if the setup doesn't!  :)

You might look good Denny, but you notice a lot of us use something other than our picture as an avatar.
No..wait...that logic falls apart when you look at oscarvan's avatar. ;D Well, just never mind then.

 ;) Just fooling with ya, oscarvan...your avatar is quite handsome.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 05:18:30 PM by kerneldustjacket »
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Offline timmyr

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2011, 06:47:28 PM »
There are a ton of ways to equip yourself.  Do what suits you best and seek out the advice of those who have built similar or brewed on similar systems to what you think you want.  It is a truly iterative process.  I was partial mashing a couple years ago and moved to stainless....I ran into all sorts of unexpected speed bumps along the way, but am happy and have enjoyed the ride.  Its all about the journey.
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Offline dbarber

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2011, 01:18:50 PM »
I'd have to agree with the consensus here - KISS.  My setup is pretty rudimentary (here's a pic http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=640758&l=10df47a663&id=1077800222). 

It's nice to see someone else who uses saw horses in their brew setup.  ;D


Saw horses are great! I got a little fancy tho, and threw on a piece of plywood.  :D
http://www.flickr.com/photos/15193128@N02/5320733233/

The 4x4s under the cooler are a nice touch.   :D
Dave Barber
Orwigsburg, PA
Lehigh Valley Homebrewers

Offline dano14041

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2011, 02:17:56 PM »
I'd have to agree with the consensus here - KISS.  My setup is pretty rudimentary (here's a pic http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=640758&l=10df47a663&id=1077800222). 

It's nice to see someone else who uses saw horses in their brew setup.  ;D


Saw horses are great! I got a little fancy tho, and threw on a piece of plywood.  :D
http://www.flickr.com/photos/15193128@N02/5320733233/

The 4x4s under the cooler are a nice touch.   :D

I shortened the output hose and was able to do away with those unnecessary things. I do still put the 2x4 under the cooler when I am draining, just to make me feel like I am getting all I can out of there.  :D
Tulsa, OK

Offline skyler

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2011, 01:17:30 AM »
One thing stuck out in the OP - don't use an aluminum kettle for your wort (though it should be ok for just heating water).

Offline Kit B

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2011, 03:20:18 PM »
One thing stuck out in the OP - don't use an aluminum kettle for your wort (though it should be ok for just heating water).

I disagree.
Aluminum is perfectly safe.
But, I do prefer stainless.
Just make sure to "season" your aluminum & don't scrub off the oxidation layer.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 03:22:23 PM by Kit B »
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Offline gmac

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2011, 09:41:10 AM »
Please explain "seasoning" aluminum.  I did my last couple in aluminum.  I have to buy a couple new pots and I'll buy stainless if I can afford it.  I know it's better but price is a factor.
Thanks

Online Mark G

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2011, 10:25:53 AM »
Boil water in the pot for an hour and it will leave an oxide layer on the surface of the aluminum. Then just never scrub hard enough in subsequent uses to remove the oxide layer. Stainless is nice, but aluminum is so much cheaper. I use a 10 gallon aluminum pot for my BK. I think I paid 40 bucks for it at an online restaurant supply store. And it is thick and solid. I'm pretty sure I could drop it from the roof of my house and it might dent, but I doubt it.
Mark Gres

Offline gmac

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2011, 12:16:08 PM »
I've purchased my 52 L Coleman Extreme and the braided hose for the washing machine but I couldn't really find anything that would be a suitable fitting to connect the two and put a valve on the outside.  I know I read in another thread what someone did but I can't find it.  So, what parts do you recommend for putting it all together? 
Ideally, I'd like to find a piece of threaded tubing that I could put a gasket and washer on both sides and tighten it into the drain hole  but all I could find was regular black gas fittings or galvanized.  I'd prefer stainless or brass (thoughts?).  Pex fittings looked promising but expensive and I've never used the stuff.  Worse case, I solder some fittings onto a piece of copper tubing but I'm sure there is an easier way.
Thanks

Offline weithman5

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2011, 12:28:57 PM »
i wouldn't worry about the threaded end. you will likely lose this getting the stainless braid off the inner hose anyway.  then just put the stainless braid on to a fitting with a small hose clamp. put this fitting to a rubber hose with another hose clamp then put this hose in a grommet that goes on the cooler where you have taken out the drain valve.
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Offline hokerer

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2011, 12:36:05 PM »
Or, don't even remove the drain valve.  On the eXtreme, the drain valve is about the perfect size to squeeze a piece of 3/8 clear vinyl tubing through.  Push the tubing through the drain hole from the outside and hose clamp the braid to the tubing (I put a short little piece of copper tubing (from an old sink feeder line) into the end of the tubing so I could tighten the clamp as hard as I wanted to without collapsing the tubing, but that's probably not really necessary).  If you want, you can add a little aquarium sealant where the tubing goes through the drain hole but lots of folks report that's not necessary either.  You can then add an inline valve to the tubing outside the cooler or, like I do, just raise the end of the tubing to shut off flow and lower the end when you want to drain.
Joe

Offline gmac

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #28 on: March 07, 2011, 05:35:16 PM »
Cooler is coming along.  I over did it as always with brass fittings and a tap and everything, had to get my friend to machine a couple parts for me but he gets paid in beer so its good.  I'll try to put on a picture.
Bought my kettle today.  Couldn't afford stainless.  Went with Aluminum so I will have to season it as described above.  Does it need to be full or just some water in it?  I sort of over did on the pot too.  I got a 60 quart pot which I think is 15 gallons (not sure if that is US or Imperial gallons).  Either way I have enough for a 10 gal batch when I get up to it.
Someday I hope to stop buying parts and actually make some beer...

Online Mark G

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Re: Schematic
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2011, 09:42:35 PM »
Cooler is coming along.  I over did it as always with brass fittings and a tap and everything, had to get my friend to machine a couple parts for me but he gets paid in beer so its good.  I'll try to put on a picture.
Bought my kettle today.  Couldn't afford stainless.  Went with Aluminum so I will have to season it as described above.  Does it need to be full or just some water in it?  I sort of over did on the pot too.  I got a 60 quart pot which I think is 15 gallons (not sure if that is US or Imperial gallons).  Either way I have enough for a 10 gal batch when I get up to it.
Someday I hope to stop buying parts and actually make some beer...
You won't think you overdid it as soon as you brew your first 10 gallon batch.

I'm not sure if you can get away with only filling the pot partway to season it. I filled mine all the way (or within a couple inches of the top) when I seasoned it. If anything, you can test it's performance on a burner to get that much liquid to a boil. You can also season it in the oven, but I don't know the details off the top of my head. I believe Palmer covers it in How To Brew, but I don't have my copy handy since I gave it to my brother to convert him to homebrewing.
Mark Gres