Author Topic: Cold Fermenting Ales  (Read 2033 times)

Offline ndcube

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Cold Fermenting Ales
« on: December 02, 2009, 09:41:58 AM »
I have two Ales going right now.
An Imperial IPA (US-05) and an Alt (1007).  Both are fermenting in my basement at 54.5F (wort temp).

What can I expect from the colder fermentation?  Just longer ferment time?  Sulfur (I don't smell any)?

Would it be better if I invest in a couple of fish aquarium heaters for my swamp coolers?  My basement could still get a little colder as the winter progresses.

I also plan on doing a Kolsch.

Thanks.

Offline denny

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2009, 09:59:33 AM »
I have two Ales going right now.
An Imperial IPA (US-05) and an Alt (1007).  Both are fermenting in my basement at 54.5F (wort temp).

What can I expect from the colder fermentation?  Just longer ferment time?  Sulfur (I don't smell any)?

Would it be better if I invest in a couple of fish aquarium heaters for my swamp coolers?  My basement could still get a little colder as the winter progresses.

I also plan on doing a Kolsch.

Thanks.

Longer fermentation times and cleaner beers will be the main effects.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline ndcube

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2009, 10:05:41 AM »
Clear beer... I don't know if I can handle that...  Guess I can try.  ;D

Offline bluesman

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2009, 10:24:53 AM »

I also plan on doing a Kolsch.

Thanks.

I usually fermet my Kolsch @ 50-54F. It gives it a cleaner profile.
Ron Price

Offline ndcube

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2009, 11:34:06 AM »

I also plan on doing a Kolsch.

Thanks.

I usually fermet my Kolsch @ 50-54F. It gives it a cleaner profile.

Sweet!  That's probably where my basement will be in Janurary.

Offline dontblake

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2009, 12:51:25 PM »
Looks good for a steam beer, too.   sorry, "California Common"
Don Blake, Erie CO
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Offline ndcube

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2009, 01:03:58 PM »
Looks good for a steam beer, too.   sorry, "California Common"

Man, my pipeline keeps getting longer.  Pretty soon I'll be back to brewing Belgian's!

Offline majorvices

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2009, 01:07:50 PM »
Just be sure to warm them up near the end to insure they attenuate. That's pretty darn cold for an ale. 58 is about the coldest I go.
Keith Y.
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Offline 3dogbrewer

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2009, 04:53:36 AM »
I made a simple ale with Nottingham at 62F. It was too clean. Very bland. I won't do it again unless I throw in some specialty grains or something to give it some flavour.

Offline crabber

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Re: Cold Fermenting Ales
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2009, 08:29:07 PM »
Nottingham gobbles up fermentables other yeasts leave behind and creates a pretty dry beer (and clean if used at low temps).  I even find US-05 is a little too clean and dry for my taste in most of the beers I've made with it.