Author Topic: Preparing Oak Staves  (Read 7035 times)

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2011, 09:11:08 AM »
1vert<<<<has new glasses...they don't werk!!!   :D :D :D
A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2011, 10:42:23 AM »
Nice. I'm leaning toward cutting the stave up into manageable chunks, charring the raw edges, baking in the oven for 15-30 minutes at 350 degrees (F), giving them a soak in a Four Roses bath for a couple of days, and chucking them into a bucket fermenter filled with brown ale and some Roeselare blend.

Then, I'll forget about it for about a year.

Thank you all for the suggestions, information, and advice! Keep 'em coming for others who have similar questions in the future since there's not much information out there at present.

You mention using a bucket & forgetting it for a year. I'd be concerned about doing that. I'd feel more comfortable leaving it in a carboy. That said, aging in a cask allows for slow contact/interaction with air (more so in smaller cask with less volume to surface). Might be fine, what do the rest of you think?
Mark Tumarkin
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2011, 12:00:31 AM »
Nice. I'm leaning toward cutting the stave up into manageable chunks, charring the raw edges, baking in the oven for 15-30 minutes at 350 degrees (F), giving them a soak in a Four Roses bath for a couple of days, and chucking them into a bucket fermenter filled with brown ale and some Roeselare blend.

Then, I'll forget about it for about a year.

Thank you all for the suggestions, information, and advice! Keep 'em coming for others who have similar questions in the future since there's not much information out there at present.

You mention using a bucket & forgetting it for a year. I'd be concerned about doing that. I'd feel more comfortable leaving it in a carboy. That said, aging in a cask allows for slow contact/interaction with air (more so in smaller cask with less volume to surface). Might be fine, what do the rest of you think?
I think it depends on what he's going for, so it's good to discuss it.

With normal yeasts I'd agree to go with a keg or carboy to keep the O2 out, but he's using the Roeselare blend.  Besides the brett, a little bit of O2 getting into the beer will emphasize the flor in the blend, so that's no problem if that's what the OP wants.

If it's a concern and kegs are not an option but it can be left undistrubed for a year, I would probably do it in a bucket but wrap the bucket with aluminum foil and hold it on with packing tape.  That should reduce the transfer through the sides anyway, the bottom shouldn't be an issue since it will presumably be resting on something, so that just leaves the top.  You could foil it, or just RDWHAHB.  :)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline ghumphrey

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2011, 01:21:59 PM »
... or just RDWHAHB.  :)

That's exactly what I plan to do...

Racked the beer to a plastic bucket over the weekend and added the sufficiently sanitized and charred (on all sides) stave. Pitched the blend and set it in a basement corner to let the bugs do their work. A bit of O2 is just fine with me. If I had full cask, O2 would be present anyway...

Now, I'll taste it in a few months and decide then whether to add any fruit - thinking maybe raspberries or cherries.
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Offline Hydro

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2011, 08:51:14 AM »
Not sure what RDWHAHB means.

Oh well,  how is your bucket fermentation project going?



... or just RDWHAHB.  :)

That's exactly what I plan to do...

Racked the beer to a plastic bucket over the weekend and added the sufficiently sanitized and charred (on all sides) stave. Pitched the blend and set it in a basement corner to let the bugs do their work. A bit of O2 is just fine with me. If I had full cask, O2 would be present anyway...

Now, I'll taste it in a few months and decide then whether to add any fruit - thinking maybe raspberries or cherries.
For the Love of Beer,
Hydro

On Tap Now:
1. Irish Red Ale
2. American Amber Ale
3. Kolsch
4. Scotch Ale
5. Strong Scotch Ale
6. Key Lime Pie (11%) Chilled to 29 deg. F. you can not even taste the alcohol.

It is time to start brewing again.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2011, 11:16:03 AM »
Tom Schmidlin

Offline Hydro

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Re: Preparing Oak Staves
« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2011, 11:27:16 AM »
For the Love of Beer,
Hydro

On Tap Now:
1. Irish Red Ale
2. American Amber Ale
3. Kolsch
4. Scotch Ale
5. Strong Scotch Ale
6. Key Lime Pie (11%) Chilled to 29 deg. F. you can not even taste the alcohol.

It is time to start brewing again.