Author Topic: Question about aging.  (Read 1347 times)

Offline uintafly

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Question about aging.
« on: January 15, 2011, 04:46:21 PM »
I know different styles require different aging times and it seems like a good rule of thumb is the higher the fg the longer the aging. But is aging time solely a function of gravity or are there other factors to consider?

Offline Slowbrew

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 05:01:37 PM »
I've never really thought it was all about gravity.  I usually think about it more from a dark verse light decision.  I will keep dark beers like porters and stouts in starage for long periods of time because they develop very nicely over longer timeframes.  High alcohol beers will also age well but I do not keep light colored beers in storage for long periods.

Not really scientific but it has worked for me.

Paul
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Offline hokerer

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 06:15:45 PM »
Also, the really hop forward brews don't seem to benefit so much from aging as the hop aroma/flavor dissipates with time.
Joe

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2011, 05:11:32 AM »
I'd say there is no hard and fast rule. Some of the low gravity beers need aged the longest, such as Berliner weisse. Where as some  high gravity beers are best when young, such as IIPA.
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Offline ipaguy

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2011, 07:50:37 AM »
Another point is sanitation.  The longer you plan to age a beer, the more immaculate your sanitation needs to be.  I also agree that it depends a lot on what style you're aiming for:  the same beer sampled young might be considered an IIPA.  Age it a couple years and you could call it a barleywine.
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Online tumarkin

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2011, 08:18:53 AM »
I've never really thought it was all about gravity.  I usually think about it more from a dark verse light decision.  I will keep dark beers like porters and stouts in starage for long periods of time because they develop very nicely over longer timeframes.  High alcohol beers will also age well but I do not keep light colored beers in storage for long periods.

Not really scientific but it has worked for me.

Paul

Some light or lighter colored beers can benefit from extended aging as well. Consider a a lager like Samiclaus or some of the Belgian styles. Gravity is one of the key factors for choosing which beers to cellar, though it's not the whole picture.
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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2011, 09:30:11 AM »
But is aging time solely a function of gravity or are there other factors to consider?

Your personal tastes and preferences.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 11:39:30 AM by denny »
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2011, 11:35:19 AM »
But is aging time solely a function of gravity or are there other factors to consider?

You personal tastes and preferences.
I'll add that if your beer isn't very good before aging that you need to change something in your brewing process.
Aging goes a long way toward removing unwanted flavors, including some fairly bad ones.  Live yeast work wonders.
If you HAVE to age, take a look at your process.
Aging can bring in some outstanding oxidition notes (dark fruits, sherry).

But the bottom line is your personal tastes and preferences.
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Offline Slowbrew

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2011, 11:48:13 AM »
I've never really thought it was all about gravity.  I usually think about it more from a dark verse light decision.  I will keep dark beers like porters and stouts in starage for long periods of time because they develop very nicely over longer timeframes.  High alcohol beers will also age well but I do not keep light colored beers in storage for long periods.

Not really scientific but it has worked for me.

Paul

Some light or lighter colored beers can benefit from extended aging as well. Consider a a lager like Samiclaus or some of the Belgian styles. Gravity is one of the key factors for choosing which beers to cellar, though it's not the whole picture.


Good points and I agree completely.   I haven't really brewed beers like those (yet) so I wasn't thinking that way.

Paul
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Offline uintafly

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2011, 06:46:13 PM »
Thanks for the info guys. As with many of the things I am learning in this new hobby, there really is no hard and fast rule.

Offline tomsawyer

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2011, 05:12:08 AM »
Iwouldn't call the long storage of a Berlinner weisse or lambic, to be aging in the strict sense of the word.  Its more of an extended fermentation with bacteria and Brett, they take a long time and theres a progression of organisms that work their way through your beer.
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Online tumarkin

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2011, 06:14:27 AM »
Iwouldn't call the long storage of a Berlinner weisse or lambic, to be aging in the strict sense of the word.  Its more of an extended fermentation with bacteria and Brett, they take a long time and theres a progression of organisms that work their way through your beer.

Good point...... extended fermentation is very different from aging (cellaring in bottle, or keg)
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Offline uthristy

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2011, 06:43:21 AM »

Some light or lighter colored beers can benefit from extended aging as well. Consider a a lager like Samiclaus or some of the Belgian styles. Gravity is one of the key factors for choosing which beers to cellar, though it's not the whole picture.

Explain what light colored Belgian beers age well?  Triples & pales,blonds all peak within 1-2yrs, Some saisons do age ok, same for Orval but really most of the lighter colored  tend to be better at a younger age.

I wouldn't say they go bad but some really drop-off really fast, Duvel comes to mind.

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2011, 07:16:45 AM »

Some light or lighter colored beers can benefit from extended aging as well. Consider a a lager like Samiclaus or some of the Belgian styles. Gravity is one of the key factors for choosing which beers to cellar, though it's not the whole picture.

Explain what light colored Belgian beers age well?  Triples & pales,blonds all peak within 1-2yrs, Some saisons do age ok, same for Orval but really most of the lighter colored  tend to be better at a younger age.

I wouldn't say they go bad but some really drop-off really fast, Duvel comes to mind.

Certainly some of the Trappist Tripels, Westmalle & Westvleteren are two that come to mind. I've had some great vintage examples of both. Another style would be the Golden Strongs. You say Duvel drops off really fast. In some side by sides with Duvel, a number of us prefered the 2-3 year old examples to the fresh.

Where in FL are you, Uthristy?
If you're interested in attending some tastings of vintage beers and are close enough to make a trip to Ocala, go ahead and pm me. Jim Ritchhart, one of our club members (of Gainesville's Hogtwon Brewers) lives in Ocala. He puts on vintage beer tastings on a semi-regular basis. I help him organize those. Let me know if you're interested.
Mark Tumarkin
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Offline uthristy

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Re: Question about aging.
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2011, 08:51:37 AM »

Certainly some of the Trappist Tripels, Westmalle & Westvleteren are two that come to mind. I've had some great vintage examples of both. Another style would be the Golden Strongs. You say Duvel drops off really fast. In some side by sides with Duvel, a number of us prefered the 2-3 year old examples to the fresh.

< edit to add Blond beers >
(Blond ->Westmalle & Westvleteren I like fresh, the darker beers do get far better with age. The thing with Duvel was when we had delivered fresh that morning  vs  bottles a few weeks older. The fresher was bursting with hoppy aroma with a huge rocky head, while the slighty older was already fading. Nit picky but it really made a impression on how fast beer can change.

fresh

older

Where in FL are you, Uthristy?
If you're interested in attending some tastings of vintage beers and are close enough to make a trip to Ocala, go ahead and pm me. Jim Ritchhart, one of our club members (of Gainesville's Hogtwon Brewers) lives in Ocala. He puts on vintage beer tastings on a semi-regular basis. I help him organize those. Let me know if you're interested.

Close enough that you may have drank some of my beers :o
But really my wife signed us up to Hogtwon Brewers several yrs ago but we never went, LOL
We're by Newberry & Trenton.

I've heard about Jim Ritchhart from http://belgianbeerboard.com/,  we also visit Belgium alot.

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« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 10:36:53 AM by uthristy »