Author Topic: A simple model for pH buffers  (Read 2295 times)

Offline bluesman

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Re: A simple model for pH buffers
« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2011, 10:45:56 AM »
Excellent article Kai!

I always enjoy reading through your articles...after two cups of coffee.  ;D
Ron Price

Offline madscientist

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Re: A simple model for pH buffers
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2011, 07:25:45 PM »
Take it from a chemist:

Dont rinse your pH meter with tap water!!!!!  Use distilled water!
Homebrewed since 2010

Offline mabrungard

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Re: A simple model for pH buffers
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2011, 06:26:30 AM »

One question, are the test kits necessary if I have the report from my municipal supplier? I do realize the reports are averages, and can vary quite a bit by season. Whoops, did I just answer my own question? The test kit would also be useful when using or blending different water.

Yes if your water supply varies, then those aquarium test kits for hardness and alkalinity are pretty nice additions.  They're cheap too. 

Water supplies vary if the supplier gets their water from a variety of groundwater and/or surfacewater sources. 

With the baseline information that is reported by the water supplier, the test kits can help you decide how the present water quality is going to affect your brewing.   
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: A simple model for pH buffers
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2011, 07:31:08 AM »
My own view is that a water report gets you in the ballpark and further testing isn't really necessary.  We're not talking about stuff that has to be within 5% to be right.

Before I'd get test kits and have to use them repeatedly, I think I'd just get a cheap pH meter, some cal buffers and storage solution.
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Offline Kaiser

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Re: A simple model for pH buffers
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2011, 08:29:39 AM »
My own view is that a water report gets you in the ballpark and further testing isn't really necessary.  We're not talking about stuff that has to be within 5% to be right.

Before I'd get test kits and have to use them repeatedly, I think I'd just get a cheap pH meter, some cal buffers and storage solution.

I think both these test kits and pH meters are useful if you are on a water supply that can change dramatically with the seasons. I’m saying this because you may want to know ahead of time if you are dealing with soft and low alkalinity water or will have hard and high alkalinity water. The latter may actually need to have some hardness and alkalinity removed rather than neutralizing the alkalinity with acids in the water and/or mash.

But you are correct; being in the ballpark is fine which is why I think these GH&KH test kits give you enough water information to make a good pH shift prediction.

Kai

Offline mabrungard

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Re: A simple model for pH buffers
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2011, 09:02:22 AM »
I have no problem with the ball park sentiment.  +/- 10 ppm on any ion isn't going to be a big deal.  But if the water is going to change much more than that, especially hardness or alkalinity, then having a decent idea of the change will be helpful. 

If you were trying to replicate a previous brew, it would be tough to do with a variable water.  If you're just making beer, then the heck with it.  RDWHAHB
Martin B
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