Author Topic: Filtration.....  (Read 3307 times)

Online euge

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2011, 12:06:38 PM »
Gelatin still needs 4-5 days......
I disagree. Crash cool as low as you can go and add some gelatin and from my experience you will clear in 24hrs. The key is to get the beer super cold without freezing it.  ;)
Bluesman,
How do you prepare gelatin for 30 deg beer?  I would think it would clot right up immediately.  I've used Polyclar and I filter, but I have never used gelatin.

Dave

For a five gallon keg.

1 tsp gelatin
1 cup water @ RT

Heat gelatin and water in microwave until the first bubble appears and remove. Chill mixture in refrigerator until cool to touch but don't let it gealatinize. Add chilled gelatin mixture to chilled keg and stir in very gently as not to introduce oxygen into beer. Allow beer to chill for 24-48 hrs and blow out gelatin from bottom of keg. I usually lose a half pint to blow out. More often than not I get very clear beer using this method.

I would like to try this for certain beers, but would also plan to do it in primary or secondary and not in the keg. Same procedure?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline oscarvan

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2011, 07:59:11 PM »
Thanks for all the input. It has been kegged and force carbed, the large chunks have settled down, and been tapped and discarded. I am skipping the filtering, for the simple reason that the particular system that I was considering has a lot of loss in the filter itself.....

It is hazy, but it tastes great. It will be "marketed" as a "Green IPA" (Ultra fresh with lots of nutrients).

It will be consumed by 30 people, cramped in a hotel room, stuffing their faces with delivery pizza. I have a feeling it will be most appreciated.  ;D

One thing I did confirm, is that you need to reduce your bittering hops when you convert an extract recipe to AG..... :o
« Last Edit: January 27, 2011, 08:00:45 PM by oscarvan »
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http://www.woodenshoemusic.com/WSBW/WSBW_All_grain_Setup.html
I brew WITH style..... not necessarily TO style.....

Online euge

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2011, 08:06:19 PM »
Thanks for all the input. It has been kegged and force carbed, the large chunks have settled down, and been tapped and discarded. I am skipping the filtering, for the simple reason that the particular system that I was considering has a lot of loss in the filter itself.....

It is hazy, but it tastes great. It will be "marketed" as a "Green IPA" (Ultra fresh with lots of nutrients).

It will be consumed by 30 people, cramped in a hotel room, stuffing their faces with delivery pizza. I have a feeling it will be most appreciated.  ;D

One thing I did confirm, is that you need to reduce your bittering hops when you convert an extract recipe to AG..... :o

Sounds like fun I'm sure they'll love it!

Why the need to reduce hop amounts? Were you doing concentrated boils?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline corkybstewart

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2011, 09:12:25 PM »
I just hope the 30 people crammed into a hotel room don't get the screaming green beer farts, it will be like falling headfirst intoa septic tank.
I'd really just rather be brewing in sunny Carlsbad New Mexico

Offline tubercle

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2011, 10:29:36 PM »
1. Styrofoam cups (I think someone already mentioned the red plastic ones).

2. Study the likes and times and philosophy of P.T.Barnum, my personal hero and mentor.

3. Practice this is a mirror: "Do you realize how much you would have to pay for beer of this quality in a store?..and you're getting it for free? Very few professional breweries can produce beer with this character. Notice the slight haze? They can't do that even with all of their several million $$$ worth of equipment and I did this in my basement! If you want more you better get it now because its going pretty fast".
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2011, 01:00:34 AM »
I'll just add that every single time I try to rush a beer to meet my schedule, I've been disappointed.  Do you really want to serve people beer that isn't the best representation of what you can do?
The key, I've found, is to make a beer that can be done very quickly.  Low alcohol, lots of yeast, etc.  Tastes great :)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline jklinck

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2011, 02:51:11 AM »
The canister filter isn't the best option, you want to use a plate filter like this one:
http://morebeer.com/view_product/5759/103554/Beer_and_Wine_Plate_Filter_Kit_

I've been using a plate filter for about a year and couldn't be happier. So far I have found ZERO cons to using a filter.

On a side note I just confirmed with Vinnie Cilurzo (owner/head brewer Russian River) that all bottled Pliny is filtered AFTER dry hopping. So that should put to rest the whole myth that filtering has any effect on flavor or aroma.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2011, 05:25:42 AM »
3. Practice this is a mirror: "Do you realize how much you would have to pay for beer of this quality in a store?..and you're getting it for free? Very few professional breweries can produce beer with this character. Notice the slight haze? They can't do that even with all of their several million $$$ worth of equipment and I did this in my basement! If you want more you better get it now because its going pretty fast".

Priceless  :D
Ron Price

Offline bluesman

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #23 on: January 28, 2011, 05:26:49 AM »
I'll just add that every single time I try to rush a beer to meet my schedule, I've been disappointed.  Do you really want to serve people beer that isn't the best representation of what you can do?
The key, I've found, is to make a beer that can be done very quickly.  Low alcohol, lots of yeast, etc.  Tastes great :)

Hefe's come to mind here Tom.  :)
Ron Price

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2011, 10:04:05 AM »
I'll just add that every single time I try to rush a beer to meet my schedule, I've been disappointed.  Do you really want to serve people beer that isn't the best representation of what you can do?
The key, I've found, is to make a beer that can be done very quickly.  Low alcohol, lots of yeast, etc.  Tastes great :)

Hefe's come to mind here Tom.  :)
Sure, but lots of styles lend themselves to it.  Ant Hayes made a comment somewhere around here about English running beers.  Here it is:

I quite often brew on a Saturday and serve the following Friday.

English running beer is what you are after - ordinary bitter, London brown ale, milds, sweet stouts, etc..

Both Windsor and Nottingham yeasts can finish by Wednesday - Windsor finishes before Nottingham but doesn't ferment as dry.
Two sachets of dry yeast for 20 litres does the trick. I ferment at around 18°C.

Rack into a keg Wednesday night and chill. Carbonate (and dry hop) Thursday night and serve on Friday night.

The beer may be a little hazy - ceramic mugs help - but fresh beer tastes great.

Ant Hayes
Tonbridge, Kent
Tom Schmidlin

Offline bluesman

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2011, 10:20:52 AM »
I quite often brew on a Saturday and serve the following Friday.

English running beer is what you are after - ordinary bitter, London brown ale, milds, sweet stouts, etc..

Both Windsor and Nottingham yeasts can finish by Wednesday - Windsor finishes before Nottingham but doesn't ferment as dry.
Two sachets of dry yeast for 20 litres does the trick. I ferment at around 18°C.

Rack into a keg Wednesday night and chill. Carbonate (and dry hop) Thursday night and serve on Friday night.

The beer may be a little hazy - ceramic mugs help - but fresh beer tastes great.

Ant Hayes
Tonbridge, Kent

I can believe it. The fermentation is probably done in two days and a couple more days of cleaning up then cold crash and keg. AFAIAC...5 gallons of beer in a weeks time is a beautiful thing.  :)
Ron Price

Online euge

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #26 on: January 28, 2011, 11:06:20 AM »
I started out brewing like this. Great beer can be made quickly- particularly if one kegs. I might just knock a quickie out this evening.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline oscarvan

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2011, 11:50:01 AM »
OK, I changed my mind, again.....  ;D

Today ran it through a 25 micron and 5 micron filter in series...... It got the big chunks out and most of the haze, although not all. After a few hours in the fridge It looks presentable to me, and again, it's a party not a competition. And, it tastes absolutely wonderful, I am pleased.

Euge, I like the sales pitch..... but mine is:

It's like bread, fresh out of the oven. Nothing is better!
« Last Edit: January 28, 2011, 11:59:42 AM by oscarvan »
Wooden Shoe Brew Works (not a commercial operation) Bethlehem, PA
http://www.woodenshoemusic.com/WSBW/WSBW_All_grain_Setup.html
I brew WITH style..... not necessarily TO style.....

Online euge

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #28 on: January 28, 2011, 12:21:12 PM »
OK, I changed my mind, again.....  ;D

Today ran it through a 25 micron and 5 micron filter in series...... It got the big chunks out and most of the haze, although not all. After a few hours in the fridge It looks presentable to me, and again, it's a party not a competition. And, it tastes absolutely wonderful, I am pleased.

Euge, I like the sales pitch..... but mine is:

It's like bread, fresh out of the oven. Nothing is better!

Hey post some pics!

I read a year or so ago that using the house filters reduced the conditioning time. Haven't tried it myself!
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline dak0415

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Re: Filtration.....
« Reply #29 on: January 28, 2011, 01:03:51 PM »
I've been filtering for 3 of my 4.5 years homebrewing, using the 10" house type filters.
I view filtering as shortening the natural conditioning time.  I use 1 micron spun filters with no fining for porters or other opaque beers, no filtering for weizens (naturally) and .5 micron (absolute) for beers that I want sparkling clear (most).  One week, at least, conditioning at 30 deg, add 1 tbs of polyclar per 5 gallons, then filter while the PPVC is still in suspension.  This combination removes any chill haze, the PPVC builds up on the filter, adding to the depth and attracting more haze as the beer passes through.  I move my beer around a lot for parties and festivals and this process leaves NO sediment even after months of storage.  The washable filter will last me about a year or 200 gallons, whichever comes first.
Dave Koenig
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