Author Topic: DME  (Read 1306 times)

Offline ljandersen

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DME
« on: February 04, 2011, 01:15:55 AM »
Does DME stand for Dry Malt Extract or Diastatic Malt Extract? Does DME have enzymes? What is the difference between DME and Diastatic malt powder used in baking bread? What is the difference between Light DME and just DME? I did some research online and got confusing answers. Any help would be appreciated. If you didn't already guess it I am new to homebrewing.

Offline Hokerer

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Re: DME
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2011, 01:28:01 AM »
In homebrewing context, DME means Dry Malt Extract and, while the process of making it involves enzymes, by the time it gets to you, they're done fer.  Also, light just refers to the color.  You can get DME from extra light to dark and shades in between.
Joe

Offline 1vertical

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Re: DME
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2011, 06:03:32 AM »
In homebrewing context, DME means Dry Malt Extract and, while the process of making it involves enzymes, by the time it gets to you, they're done fer.  Also, light just refers to the color.  You can get DME from extra light to dark and shades in between.

start with the light it is so easy to make your beer darker, do a dark malt steep etc.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: DME
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2011, 06:04:19 AM »
Also, light DME is just lighter in color than other DME.  Different manufacturers have different names for their DME, some are useful outside that brand and some are not.  Light is a color descriptor that may or may not be lighter than some other manufacturers DME, while Pilsner DME is made with pilsner malt so that gives you some information.

Diastatic malt powder has the enzymes that will break the starch in the flour down to sugar.  It helps the bread rise by feeding the yeast.  Non-diastatic malt powder doesn't have the enzymes.

But if you want consistent results, you should probably only use malt powder intended for use in making beer.  The baking malt powders often (but not always) have additives to help bakers, and the flavor is reported to be inferior in beer.  It's an enhancer in breads, it's one of the main flavors in beer.
Tom Schmidlin