Author Topic: More about water  (Read 3223 times)

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7223
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: More about water
« Reply #30 on: February 01, 2011, 12:36:17 AM »
I tried the Zerowater system, but even my softened water makes it unfeasible from a cost standpoint. I could use my RO and get pure water probably forever, though doing that somehow seems redundant.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline mabrungard

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1097
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: More about water
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2011, 07:21:17 AM »
I wouldn't call the filter worthwhile, but it doesn't really hurt the brewing water.  Go for it.
Really?  There's an awful lot of people that want to reduce the HCO3 in their brewing water.

It should also remove much of the organic compounds that can make surface water taste foul in the warm weather.

There are far better alternatives for reducing HCO3 than a filter like that. Either acid addition or boiling are much better options.

In my statement above, I was speaking about the cation exchange filter.  Activated Carbon is very useful to nearly anyone.  Sorry for the confusion!
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water

Offline malzig

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 466
    • View Profile
Re: More about water
« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2011, 07:21:20 PM »
There are far better alternatives for reducing HCO3 than a filter like that. Either acid addition or boiling are much better options.
Alternatives, surely, but "far better" seems to be a matter of personal preference.  A lot of homebrewers might find passing water over a filter readily available at the supermarket to be preferable to boiling or sourcing, storing and measuring acid.

The Brita's reduction of 120 ppm HCO3 to 16 ppm seems pretty effective.