Author Topic: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?  (Read 460 times)

Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2019, 07:08:41 PM »
I was always in the opinion that barley variety matter.

Look at Weyermann German Pilsner, Bohemian Pilsner and Barke Pilsner. Different barley Malted in the same facility (most likely the same way) {I could be wrong}.
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Offline Robert

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2019, 08:06:26 PM »
I was always in the opinion that barley variety matter.

Look at Weyermann German Pilsner, Bohemian Pilsner and Barke Pilsner. Different barley Malted in the same facility (most likely the same way) {I could be wrong}.
My position remains that variety matters, and yet does not.  Let me explain.  A good maltster, with a good process, can make better malt from any barley variety than an inferior maltster can make from the same barley.  A truly inferior maltster can still make poor malt from the best barley.  So within a given maltster's range, a certain variety may be preferred for certain properties.  But one maltster's best product may be inferior to another's most generic grade.  To make the best beer possible, you need the best ingredients available at the time.  For me that generally starts with choosing a trusted maltster, then deciding if a certain beer demands a specialty product from their range, if such a product is currently available.  So I think the question posed in this topic -- whose MO do you prefer -- probably will point to a maltster any of whose products you would find superior to the products of other producers, maybe even to the extent that you'd prefer their basic pale malt to another's MO.   Variety is not magic; each malt must be evaluated on its own merits.

PS.  I currently am fanatical about the Weyermann Barke line, Thirsty_Monk.
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Offline denny

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2019, 08:11:16 PM »
I was always in the opinion that barley variety matter.

Look at Weyermann German Pilsner, Bohemian Pilsner and Barke Pilsner. Different barley Malted in the same facility (most likely the same way) {I could be wrong}.
My position remains that variety matters, and yet does not.  Let me explain.  A good maltster, with a good process, can make better malt from any barley variety than an inferior maltster can make from the same barley.  A truly inferior maltster can still make poor malt from the best barley.  So within a given maltster's range, a certain variety may be preferred for certain properties.  But one maltster's best product may be inferior to another's most generic grade.  To make the best beer possible, you need the best ingredients available at the time.  For me that generally starts with choosing a trusted maltster, then deciding if a certain beer demands a specialty product from their range, if such a product is currently available.  So I think the question posed in this topic -- whose MO do you prefer -- probably will point to a maltster any of whose products you would find superior to the products of other producers, maybe even to the extent that you'd prefer their basic pale malt to another's MO.   Variety is not magic; each malt must be evaluated on its own merits.

PS.  I currently am fanatical about the Weyermann Barke line, Thirsty_Monk.

But given a standardized malting process, variety makes a big difference.
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Offline Robert

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #18 on: October 21, 2019, 08:32:03 PM »
I was always in the opinion that barley variety matter.

Look at Weyermann German Pilsner, Bohemian Pilsner and Barke Pilsner. Different barley Malted in the same facility (most likely the same way) {I could be wrong}.
My position remains that variety matters, and yet does not.  Let me explain.  A good maltster, with a good process, can make better malt from any barley variety than an inferior maltster can make from the same barley.  A truly inferior maltster can still make poor malt from the best barley.  So within a given maltster's range, a certain variety may be preferred for certain properties.  But one maltster's best product may be inferior to another's most generic grade.  To make the best beer possible, you need the best ingredients available at the time.  For me that generally starts with choosing a trusted maltster, then deciding if a certain beer demands a specialty product from their range, if such a product is currently available.  So I think the question posed in this topic -- whose MO do you prefer -- probably will point to a maltster any of whose products you would find superior to the products of other producers, maybe even to the extent that you'd prefer their basic pale malt to another's MO.   Variety is not magic; each malt must be evaluated on its own merits.

PS.  I currently am fanatical about the Weyermann Barke line, Thirsty_Monk.

But given a standardized malting process, variety makes a big difference.
Exactly.   It's just that variety isn't everything.   You need good process first.  I'm curious, Denny, have you had the opportunity to compare Full Pint pale malts from, say, MG and other producers? 
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Offline denny

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #19 on: October 21, 2019, 08:51:42 PM »
I was always in the opinion that barley variety matter.

Look at Weyermann German Pilsner, Bohemian Pilsner and Barke Pilsner. Different barley Malted in the same facility (most likely the same way) {I could be wrong}.
My position remains that variety matters, and yet does not.  Let me explain.  A good maltster, with a good process, can make better malt from any barley variety than an inferior maltster can make from the same barley.  A truly inferior maltster can still make poor malt from the best barley.  So within a given maltster's range, a certain variety may be preferred for certain properties.  But one maltster's best product may be inferior to another's most generic grade.  To make the best beer possible, you need the best ingredients available at the time.  For me that generally starts with choosing a trusted maltster, then deciding if a certain beer demands a specialty product from their range, if such a product is currently available.  So I think the question posed in this topic -- whose MO do you prefer -- probably will point to a maltster any of whose products you would find superior to the products of other producers, maybe even to the extent that you'd prefer their basic pale malt to another's MO.   Variety is not magic; each malt must be evaluated on its own merits.

PS.  I currently am fanatical about the Weyermann Barke line, Thirsty_Monk.

But given a standardized malting process, variety makes a big difference.
Exactly.   It's just that variety isn't everything.   You need good process first.  I'm curious, Denny, have you had the opportunity to compare Full Pint pale malts from, say, MG and other producers?

Yeah, a number of the craft maltster here are using Full Pint.  As you say, waiting makes a difference, but there's an underlying flavor they all have.
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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2019, 09:12:59 PM »
I have attended “Malt U” a couple of times.

Since every barley (the same year different field/area) have a different levels of protein,FAN and whatever else maltsters adjust their recipe to achieve consistent product. This is usually done in steeping process. Different barley variety might be Malted differently as well. One last thing is that they also blend different batches to make unified product.

If your brewery is large enough to take full batch, they will Malt to your specifications.

Maltsters can do a lot of things in the process by steeping to get you a Malt that has a good extract and preform well in the brewhouse and with killing to develop flavor but flavorful barley variety can give you a big boost.

Barke barley is an heirloom variety.

I am very happy that we are starting to talk about barley as a flavor developer then just talk about hops.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: What Variety of Maris Otter do You Use?
« Reply #21 on: Today at 12:23:20 AM »
I find it interesting that Seth is especially interested in Full Pint crosses. I’ve been using Full Pint as a base a lot lately. I’ve had great brewhouse success with it but of course the ultimate characteristic is taste. I really like its contribution in the beers I’ve been brewing. I can begin to understand his interest.


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