Author Topic: Black and Tan  (Read 3346 times)

Offline Hokerer

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2011, 01:58:35 PM »
If you stand on your head when you drink it, maybe it'll be more what you're expecting
Joe

Offline bluesman

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2011, 02:44:39 PM »
Euge...I wish I had some to show you. It's been some time since I actually had a B & T, but I will be sure to take a pic and post when I do.

Does homebrew count?  :)
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Offline euge

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2011, 06:55:37 PM »
Euge...I wish I had some to show you. It's been some time since I actually had a B & T, but I will be sure to take a pic and post when I do.

Does homebrew count?  :)

Absolutely!
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2011, 07:29:24 AM »
For those of you talking about snakebites earlier, I saw this in my feed reader today:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/02/the-cider-press-classic-cider-cocktails.html
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Offline oscarvan

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2011, 05:51:47 PM »
Ordered a Black and Tan in Ireland, once. The barman was benevolent and didn't throw me out, but explained that that was the color of British uniforms in one of the many conflicts and to NEVER EVER say that again.
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Offline malzig

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2011, 02:37:45 AM »
Yes, a "black and tan" would be a very offensive thing to order in Ireland.

Offline alikocho

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2011, 09:12:18 AM »
Ordered a Black and Tan in Ireland, once. The barman was benevolent and didn't throw me out, but explained that that was the color of British uniforms in one of the many conflicts and to NEVER EVER say that again.

Yeah, we don't have them over here for that reason. The Black and Tans were brutal, and murderous. The best known instance was the killing of 12 at Crowe Park in 1920. The first Irish Bloody Sunday.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #22 on: February 25, 2011, 10:03:20 AM »
Ordered a Black and Tan in Ireland, once. The barman was benevolent and didn't throw me out, but explained that that was the color of British uniforms in one of the many conflicts and to NEVER EVER say that again.

Yeah, we don't have them over here for that reason. The Black and Tans were brutal, and murderous. The best known instance was the killing of 12 at Crowe Park in 1920. The first Irish Bloody Sunday.

Can you order a half and half without being frowned upon?
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Offline malzig

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #23 on: February 25, 2011, 10:58:01 AM »
These are also really common in the Czech Republic, where the mix Czech Dunkel and Pilsner.  They don't bother trying to keep the layers separate, though.  A lot of pubs will even list 3 beers on the menu, a Pilsner, a Dunkel and a mixed beer (sometimes called an Amber on the menu).

Offline alikocho

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #24 on: February 25, 2011, 11:22:33 AM »
Ordered a Black and Tan in Ireland, once. The barman was benevolent and didn't throw me out, but explained that that was the color of British uniforms in one of the many conflicts and to NEVER EVER say that again.

Yeah, we don't have them over here for that reason. The Black and Tans were brutal, and murderous. The best known instance was the killing of 12 at Crowe Park in 1920. The first Irish Bloody Sunday.

Can you order a half and half without being frowned upon?

I have no idea, but where I grew up in South London, people did used to drink 'Light and Heavy', which tended to involve a low gravity ale mixed with a higher gravity one.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2011, 04:48:31 PM »
Ordered a Black and Tan in Ireland, once. The barman was benevolent and didn't throw me out, but explained that that was the color of British uniforms in one of the many conflicts and to NEVER EVER say that again.

Yeah, we don't have them over here for that reason. The Black and Tans were brutal, and murderous. The best known instance was the killing of 12 at Crowe Park in 1920. The first Irish Bloody Sunday.
Typo - it's Croke Park.

I've never heard of a light and heavy, what kind of beers were typically mixed?  Light like a bitter?  Heavy like a . . . ?
Tom Schmidlin

Offline bluesman

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2011, 05:41:42 PM »
In Ireland a Black and Tan is normally made from a half pint of Smithwick's topped off with Guinness...So I've been told as I've never been there. This version is also sometimes referred to as a "Blacksmith" or a "Light and Bitter". During the summer months stout drinkers may order a black and tan due to its lighter texture. Likewise ale drinkers may order a Smithwick's with a Guinness head. This is an ordinary pint of Smithwick's with the last inch or so topped off with Guinness. This is some info. I found online.

Ron Price

Offline alikocho

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2011, 05:57:42 PM »
Ordered a Black and Tan in Ireland, once. The barman was benevolent and didn't throw me out, but explained that that was the color of British uniforms in one of the many conflicts and to NEVER EVER say that again.

Yeah, we don't have them over here for that reason. The Black and Tans were brutal, and murderous. The best known instance was the killing of 12 at Crowe Park in 1920. The first Irish Bloody Sunday.
Typo - it's Croke Park.

I've never heard of a light and heavy, what kind of beers were typically mixed?  Light like a bitter?  Heavy like a . . . ?

Yup, typo. That's what happens when you type with a 3 year old climbing on you. Incidentally, I examined an undergraduate dissertation today dealing with the Black and Tans.

The light was generally a bottled 'light ale'. Think pale mild. The heavy was generally a best bitter, ESB. I've never had one, so can't comment on what they. I never saw any attempt to layer them
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Black and Tan
« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2011, 06:12:18 PM »
I like pale milds, I made one based on the AK recipe in the Mild book.  It turned out very nice.  I could see blending that with an ESB. :)
Tom Schmidlin