Author Topic: Ideal temperatures on fermentation  (Read 2064 times)

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Ideal temperatures on fermentation
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2011, 11:30:44 AM »
No mix up in packaging.  I failed to read ALL the instructions and confused the pitching temperature as the fermenting temperature.  As I looked at the last line of the instructions, it said "adjust to desired fermentation temperature."  Sorry for the confusion.  There was actually no fermentation temperature listed on the package.
Right, I meant I'd let him know that you mixed up the instructions, not Wyeast :)  I didn't want him to waste time trying to track down a potential problem with their yeast in Europe.  What you are describing sounds like their standard packaging.  They don't have any that is individual by strain, the strain and mfg date are printed on the package.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: Ideal temperatures on fermentation
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2011, 11:42:19 AM »

Denny, no, I didn't make a starter.  Just let the smack pack swell for about 2 hours.

Do yourself and your beer a favor...ALWAYS make a starter.  And I don't know exactly what Wyeast's temp recommendations are, but always pitch at a slightly lower temp than your intended fermentation temp.  I recommend fermentation for 1450 at about 18C.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Ideal temperatures on fermentation
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2011, 11:56:50 AM »
No, I haven't racked yet.  It is still fermenting, but the smell coming from the bubbler is green apple.  I plan to let it sit for about a month total, but confirm with multiple gravity readings.

Like I said, I'm a noobie, so I have yet to let "Relax, don't worry, have a homebrew" sink in yet.  ;)  I guess I just don't quite know what to expect when fermenting, as this is only my second batch ever.

At this point, letting it sit on the yeast for 3 to 4 weeks total is the best strategy. 

I never get too worked up on the smells from fermentation, unless something really off is going on.  Having done lagers that smell like rotten eggs while fermenting, then turn out to have nothing but malt and hops in the aroma, makes one adopt the  RDWHAHB mantra.
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Offline brewmonk

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Re: Ideal temperatures on fermentation
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2011, 11:45:34 PM »
No mix up in packaging.  I failed to read ALL the instructions and confused the pitching temperature as the fermenting temperature.  As I looked at the last line of the instructions, it said "adjust to desired fermentation temperature."  Sorry for the confusion.  There was actually no fermentation temperature listed on the package.
Right, I meant I'd let him know that you mixed up the instructions, not Wyeast :)  I didn't want him to waste time trying to track down a potential problem with their yeast in Europe.  What you are describing sounds like their standard packaging.  They don't have any that is individual by strain, the strain and mfg date are printed on the package.

Yes, you're right on about the package.  Thanks for letting him know.

Do yourself and your beer a favor...ALWAYS make a starter.  And I don't know exactly what Wyeast's temp recommendations are, but always pitch at a slightly lower temp than your intended fermentation temp.  I recommend fermentation for 1450 at about 18C.

At this point, letting it sit on the yeast for 3 to 4 weeks total is the best strategy. 
I never get too worked up on the smells from fermentation, unless something really off is going on.  Having done lagers that smell like rotten eggs while fermenting, then turn out to have nothing but malt and hops in the aroma, makes one adopt the  RDWHAHB mantra.

Thanks for the advice, guys.  Guess I'm just going through beginner's nervousness.  Making a starter will help me take the next step up.  And I'll work harder on the RDWHAHB thing!  ;D
Br. Francis
Birra Nursia