Author Topic: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row  (Read 2119 times)

Offline phillamb168

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Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« on: February 22, 2011, 12:06:59 PM »
I can't get 6-row out here, but I do have a 25kg sack of 2-row 3 EBC pilsner. Do I need to add anything to replicate the use of 6-row? Should I use a red cooler instead of a blue cooler to get the efficiency down?
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2011, 01:26:28 PM »
6-row has high amounts of enzymes and gives a little grainy taste.  North American 2-row would work well as it has almost as much enzymes as 6-row.  Try the Euro 2-row, it should work as you are only going to have about 25% corn adjunct to convert.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2011, 01:57:44 PM »
6-row has high amounts of enzymes and gives a little grainy taste.  North American 2-row would work well as it has almost as much enzymes as 6-row.  Try the Euro 2-row, it should work as you are only going to have about 25% corn adjunct to convert.

For that grainy taste, would it work if I over-mill a certain percentage of the 2-row?
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Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2011, 02:08:21 PM »
Small thread hijack here -
I'm making a CAP this weekend, first time.
Do you run the flaked corn through the mill along with the 2-row?
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2011, 02:16:53 PM »
Phil - I would just proceed as normal and see if you like a CAP.

mainebrewer - no need to mill the flaked corn, just put it in.
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Offline dshepard

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2011, 06:04:51 PM »
I have brewed a few CAPs using American 2-row, flaked maize, and German Lager yeast (WLP830) and it comes out fantastic.  :)   This past weekend I bought an original Corona Mill and 50lbs of feed corn. (Yes I have heard that it may be too oily, I have also heard that it works just fine.). For my first CAP with the feed corn, I am going to use 6-row and a double mash.
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Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2011, 07:13:12 PM »
OK, thanks for the quick reply and info.
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Offline karlh

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Re: Classic American Pilsner 6-row vs 2-row
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2011, 03:13:16 PM »
I have used american 2 row pale, and pilsner malts for CAP.  I have read that 6 row will provide a grainy character that you will not get from Pils.  My experience with american pils malt from briess and rahr has not been so.  I think that american pils malt is a good base malt for the style and have repeatedly used it and won awards with the same basic recipe (75% american Pils malt, 25% flaked corn).  I also think that despite the high quality, these are not necessarily the best for European style pilsners because of a grainy (even American) character. 
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