Author Topic: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy  (Read 18299 times)

Offline tom

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #90 on: December 22, 2009, 07:47:44 PM »
I boiled it on the stove pretty hard for about 90 minutes until it started to foam up and it was pretty thick.  I then turned down the heat and kept it boiling for about 20 more minutes while I stirred until it stopped foaming and there was very little evaporation.  At this point it was like syrup so I added it to the kettle.

Is there a fine line between having a good carmelization/browning and burning the boil down portion? Im nowhere near a good cook, and I would be worried that I would burn it, and therefore not be able to use it
I boil it until it's foaming up and I get scared. Someone could measure the temperature with a candy thermometer.
Brew on

Offline ken

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #91 on: December 23, 2009, 01:15:04 PM »
I find that a heavy bottom pan works well for heating things that will scorch.

Offline coypoo

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #92 on: January 12, 2010, 01:36:44 AM »
i am going to make this recipe within the next two weeks, and i am wondering what the carmelization does to the final color? is it pretty accurate w/ what is predicted by the brewing softwares? thanks

Offline bonjour

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #93 on: January 12, 2010, 04:36:19 AM »
it will darken somewhat.  How much depends on you setup, power of your burner, intensity of the boil, and length of time.  Don't worry about it, just go for it

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Offline hamiltont

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #94 on: January 12, 2010, 04:55:01 PM »
The caramelization does darken the  color some but the real purpose IMO is for flavor, and it's amazing what it adds!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline coypoo

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #95 on: January 13, 2010, 03:11:58 PM »
it will darken somewhat.  How much depends on you setup, power of your burner, intensity of the boil, and length of time.  Don't worry about it, just go for it

Fred

would an inside electric range not be enough power? should i just do it on my burner outside?

Offline ndcube

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #96 on: January 13, 2010, 03:17:51 PM »
I used my indoor gas range and it worked fine.  I think it took me 90 minutes get it to the caramelizing stage.

If you can boil a gallon and a half or so of water on it vigorously then you should be good to go.

Offline bluesman

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #97 on: January 13, 2010, 05:32:33 PM »
I used my indoor gas range and it worked fine.  I think it took me 90 minutes get it to the caramelizing stage.

If you can boil a gallon and a half or so of water on it vigorously then you should be good to go.

+1

I boiled down 5 quarts to almost a pint in about the same time. Go for it... just keep a very close eye on it. You don't want any boil-overs. It should finish with the consistency of molasses.
Ron Price

Offline ndcube

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #98 on: January 13, 2010, 05:44:56 PM »
Get it poured into your kettle quick too.  It gets real sluggish as it cools.

Offline dhacker

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #99 on: January 13, 2010, 05:58:02 PM »
I usually drain some of the boiling wort from the BK into the caramelized first runnings vessel just to thin the viscosity before dumping it all back into the BK. Sure makes it easier! 
Just brew it...

Offline hamiltont

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #100 on: January 13, 2010, 06:33:21 PM »
I usually drain some of the boiling wort from the BK into the caramelized first runnings vessel just to thin the viscosity before dumping it all back into the BK. Sure makes it easier! 
Ditto!!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline coypoo

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #101 on: January 13, 2010, 10:20:29 PM »
are you boiling both simultaneously? or do you start carmelizing and when you are getting close to being finished, do you fire up the burners for the rest of the wort?

Offline ndcube

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #102 on: January 13, 2010, 10:55:19 PM »
Simultaneously.

Offline dhacker

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Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« Reply #103 on: January 13, 2010, 10:59:59 PM »
I certainly don't wait for the 1st runnings to boil down. The time line works out pretty good with a 90 minute + boil in the main BK. And you can start heating up the first runnings immediately. Takes awhile to gather the remainder of the mash wort and sparge (batch in my case) anyway, so by the time you start the timer on the BK, you're every bit of 30 minutes into the boil down of the 1st runnings.
Just brew it...