Author Topic: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.  (Read 598 times)

Offline sharg54

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 88
    • View Profile
mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« on: February 26, 2011, 06:20:12 PM »
I have made a few porters and stouts and they come out quite good but don't have much of a plum taste that I like. Could this be  boosted with the use of mollasses at the end of the boil ? And if so about how much are we talking about oz wise. Haven't been able to locate much on the topic of using this in beer. ???
People keep telling me it's not rocket science... I like rockets..

Offline corkybstewart

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1300
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2011, 06:51:12 PM »
I used to use a pound of molasses in my Imperial stout recipe, but it gave me a molasses flavor(go figure) that I didn't like.  Instead now I use a pound of Special B.
I'd really just rather be brewing in sunny Carlsbad New Mexico

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8678
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2011, 06:54:37 PM »
Instead now I use a pound of Special B.

+1

I would use this malt to get some dark fruit flavor in a big beer like this.
Ron Price

Offline pinnah

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1160
  • Wesloper, CO
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2011, 08:17:26 PM »
I like to use around 8-10 oz of molasses in a robust porter around OG 1.074.  Not too overpowering.

Not sure if it gives a fruity plum.  I might third the Special B for that.

Cheers.

Offline sharg54

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 88
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2011, 08:21:30 PM »
I haven't used the special B as of yet but may give it a try and see what taste it will provide. I have a bottle of molasses sitting around that isn't used but for cookies and was wondering if it would work. I took some the other day and mixed it with a stout from the store just to see what it did and liked the outcome. I was thinking more in the 6 oz range to a 5.5 gal batch  in the last 5 minuets of the boil but the B may be the way to go. 
People keep telling me it's not rocket science... I like rockets..

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4535
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2011, 08:27:29 PM »
I have only used the first runnings light unsulfured molasses in a Porter.  Not much of those tastes from the molasses, but it came from the special B that was in there.  A slight oxidation of the dark malts will deepen the dark fruit flavors as the beer ages.  Dark malts tend to go to sherry flavors, so this happens long before the sherry.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild, AHA Member, BJCP Certified
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8130
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2011, 09:31:30 PM »
I agree, a dark crystal malt like special b or something similar can get you what you're looking for.  I would probably start with 8 oz, but you can likely hit 16+ oz with no worries.  It depends on your base recipe.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline sharg54

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 88
    • View Profile
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2011, 12:58:14 PM »
Thanks for all the good input. I think I'll go with the B first and see how it turns out. The Molasses may add a nice twist down the road. Besides it's not going any place soon. LOL ;D
People keep telling me it's not rocket science... I like rockets..

jaybeerman

  • Guest
Re: mollasses in an imperial stout or porter.
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2011, 08:55:22 PM »
A slight oxidation of the dark malts will deepen the dark fruit flavors as the beer ages.  Dark malts tend to go to sherry flavors, so this happens long before the sherry.

I agree, a dark crystal malt like special b or something similar can get you what you're looking for.  I would probably start with 8 oz, but you can likely hit 16+ oz with no worries.  It depends on your base recipe.

Those are two very good thoughts.  (Personally, now, I use special b in my brown porter but not in my robust porter)

Alternate Take: Historically though sugar was used in porters and that's why (I'm guessing) that a lot of people gravitate towards adding molasses to their porter.  It seems like the right thing to do.  Unfortunately, few people like the end result.  So, this might work as an alternative for the people still wanting a caramelized sugar character in their porter. http://www.darkcandi.com/d.html   No reason it wouldn’t work in a porter
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 03:43:19 PM by jaybeerman »