Author Topic: Kettle ?  (Read 752 times)

Offline rayallen

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Kettle ?
« on: March 02, 2011, 09:41:26 PM »
My next Big purchase to be made is buying my kettles and burners, Id like to build a brew station.

Im either buying a 40qt or 60qt $$$ permitting. May even buy to 40qts.

My question, whats the deal with the false bottom some people are using. From what I understand its not a must have. Is it simply to stop the grains from flowing out of the pot?

Im thinking I could go with 2 40qts both with spigots and thermometers. 1 for steeping and the 2nd for boiling, I can simply open the valve to the steeping pot and then it could drain into the boiling pot.

Online morticaixavier

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Re: Kettle ?
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2011, 11:06:57 PM »
You should go with the 60 quart. if you want to do 10 gallon batches at some point 40 quarts will not be big enough for the boil.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Kettle ?
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2011, 06:14:32 AM »
I recommend a 60 qt kettle also.  I usually make 5 gal batches, but even the occasional 10 gal batch does not boil over in a 60 qt. 

I picked up a used aluminum commercial kitchen pot (nice and strong) on Ebay years ago.  One of the smarter buys I've made. 
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Offline Mark G

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Re: Kettle ?
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2011, 07:37:19 AM »
Go as big as you can afford. You won't be disappointed doing even 5 gallon batches in a 60-qt kettle. And yes, you can still get a boilover, although it takes some effort... Trust me on that one. Try searching commercial restaurant supply places online. There's lots of good deals out there, especially if you're willing to install the ball valve, etc. on your own.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Kettle ?
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2011, 07:47:11 AM »
I would also go with "bigger is better" because it allows one to expand their operation in the future.

As far as false bottoms, they are needed if you are going to use your kettle as a mash tun because with a dirct fired system they help prevent the grain from scorching and they also act as a filter for the grain bed upon lautering. However if you are planning to use the kettle as a BK then a false bottom isn't absolutely necessary.

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Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Kettle ?
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2011, 07:47:42 AM »
Go big in any equipment purchase.

The false bottom in the mash kettle keeps the grain off of the bottom of the kettel, so you can direct fire the kettle and not scorch the grain.  With a valve on the kettle, you can recirculate when the fire is on, which helps to even out the temp in the grain bed.  When you sparge, you recirculate until the wort is clear, and go to the boil kettle.

A false bottom in the boil kettle acts as a filter for hops, and to a lesser degree the break material.  I brew with a pump, so whole hops would plug the pump, but the false bottom keeps those out.  When chilling I recirculate, and the whole hops form a filter on the false bottom, and the break material collects on the hops.  The result is clear wort into the fermenter.

Hope this helps.
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Offline rayallen

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Re: Kettle ?
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2011, 08:09:24 AM »
Thanks guys for the info. This helps a lot. Guess it really doesnt matter if I go Aluminum or stainless, seems to be a simply preference.

Go big in any equipment purchase.

The false bottom in the mash kettle keeps the grain off of the bottom of the kettel, so you can direct fire the kettle and not scorch the grain.  With a valve on the kettle, you can recirculate when the fire is on, which helps to even out the temp in the grain bed.  When you sparge, you recirculate until the wort is clear, and go to the boil kettle.

A false bottom in the boil kettle acts as a filter for hops, and to a lesser degree the break material.  I brew with a pump, so whole hops would plug the pump, but the false bottom keeps those out.  When chilling I recirculate, and the whole hops form a filter on the false bottom, and the break material collects on the hops.  The result is clear wort into the fermenter.

Hope this helps.

I need to do some more reading. Recirculating is done to help make the wort as clear as possible via using a spigot and a pump. False bottom makes perfect sense now. Simply acts as a filter and also keeps you from scorching the grain.


Whats strange about all of this is I used similar methods in my aquarium hobby. False bottoms are usually kept in vivariums with tree frogs or what ever you may have to keep the water as clean as possible. Recirculating we would call a closed loop system with our fish tank.

Im learning guys, keep it coming. ;D