Author Topic: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard  (Read 15494 times)

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2011, 05:03:47 AM »
I'm resurrecting this old thread. I've been contemplating some homemade mustard, but with a less is more approach. Maybe just yellow, brown and vinegar. I do see some using mustard powder, is it somehow different than taking the seeds to dust?

don't know if it's different or not. I've only ground the seeds after soaking, not dry. I've tried doing really simple mustard versions but found that I like the spicy complexity of adding other heat/flavor sources (horseradish, ginger, hot peppers, etc). YMMV
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

Offline james

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2011, 09:10:08 AM »
I'm glad this thread got bumped, I remember reading it when first posted and decided I was going to make it.  Of course I quickly forgot about it but now it's back on my radar.


Offline euge

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2011, 10:55:53 AM »
I'm resurrecting this old thread. I've been contemplating some homemade mustard, but with a less is more approach. Maybe just yellow, brown and vinegar. I do see some using mustard powder, is it somehow different than taking the seeds to dust?

don't know if it's different or not. I've only ground the seeds after soaking, not dry. I've tried doing really simple mustard versions but found that I like the spicy complexity of adding other heat/flavor sources (horseradish, ginger, hot peppers, etc). YMMV

I ground them up in the spice mill dry, though the end result isn't as fine as the "powder". Still a very nice texture- somewhere between stone ground and smooth. The mustard was better after sitting for a few weeks.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2011, 04:31:37 PM »
I ground them up in the spice mill dry, though the end result isn't as fine as the "powder". Still a very nice texture- somewhere between stone ground and smooth. The mustard was better after sitting for a few weeks.
Yep, I can't ever grind them up as fine as the store bought powdered mustard.  I like to use a mix of seeds and powder.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline MDixon

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2011, 09:24:47 AM »
Sounds like I do need the powder. One recipe I saw said to mix everything and let it be for 8 hours and then give it a whirl in the blender or food processor. I may go this route on a 1 cup batch and see what happens.
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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2011, 10:01:39 PM »
Hint: dry seeds coffee bean chopper........
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2011, 10:03:45 PM »
Hint: dry seeds coffee bean chopper........
Yes.  But they still don't grind up as fine as the stuff you get at the grocery store.  Although maybe I should run it through a strainer to keep out the husks, maybe that would get me what I'm looking for.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2011, 10:19:07 PM »
Man, my coffee grinder flat powderizes whatever is in the thing...
You may indeed need to sift the chaff away from your desirable powder.
I have not personally tried to powderize this particular material.
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Offline euge

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2011, 10:34:32 PM »
I'll try toasting them first to drive away any moisture.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline euge

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2012, 03:21:23 PM »
I'll try toasting them first to drive away any moisture.

Per my research that's a wrong move.

I made some badass mustard earlier this week:

1/4 cup brown mustard seeds
3/4 cup white mustard seeds
2 tsp salt
2 tbs of red wine vinegar
2 tbs red wine
enough cold water to achieve desired consistency
ice cubes

I ground up the seeds in the spice grinder. Then into a blender with all the rest of the ingredients, though I added the vinegar once the mixture was somewhat blended.  Blended some more to my vision of what mustard should look like and poured into wide-mouth mason jars. Dated the tops and placed in fridge. Ended up with a respectable 1.5 pints of mustard.

The ice cubes helped keep it cold to preserve the hotness.

Initially it was very bitter, but after a couple days it is mellowing nicely with a very nice heat that lingers. It stays with you differently compared to chile heat. I'm getting a lot of sophisticated flavors dropping out of the heat.

Mustard is now back up there in the top five condiments in the euge household. Currently it's beating out mayo, sriracha and salsa.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2012, 06:42:26 AM »


Mustard is now back up there in the top five condiments in the euge household. Currently it's beating out mayo, sriracha and salsa.

Wait, I'm confused. How the hell is Siracha not in the top 5?
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline hokerer

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2012, 07:44:52 AM »


Mustard is now back up there in the top five condiments in the euge household. Currently it's beating out mayo, sriracha and salsa.

Wait, I'm confused. How the hell is Siracha not in the top 5?

I read that as he's got Siracah in third so it's still in the top 5
Joe

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2012, 06:30:50 PM »
I don't worry too much about grinding it fine, but then I like a rough, grainy textured mustard. You can always add more of the mustard powder and a bit more liquid to smooth it out if desired.

The nice thing about home-made mustard is that it's so forgiving. You can't go too far wrong - add a bit more unground or lightly ground seeds if you want it more grainy. Add a bit more ground mustard powder if you want it smoother. Add more peppers, ginger, horseradish, etc if you like a bit more bite. And you can always go back and adjust it after the fact if you really want - though I've never done that.

One of my more recent discoveries was that you can buy ground brown mustard seed as well as yellow. I hadn't seen that in the local stores until the last year or so. It's a nice addition as well.

The main problem with home-made mustard is that it disappears too damn fast, and all my friends want me to give them jars to take home.  Just like with beer, the best batches disappear way too quickly.

I've never made mustard by the galoon - but I'm thinking that might be necessary :-)
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

Offline kmccaf

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #28 on: April 02, 2012, 04:29:07 PM »
For what it's worth, we use malt vinegar. My girlfriend is the one who usually makes it, and uses a really simple method. Place the seeds (mixture of brown and yellow) in a clean, used Newman's Own salsa jar. Let them sit for the appropriate amount of time, and then use an immersion blender in the jar. Add spices or beer when blending. I think the immersion blender is genius though. Such a time saver, and no mess to clean up.
Kyle M.

Offline m.a.hummel

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Re: Hot ‘n Bothered Beer Mustard
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2012, 09:26:45 AM »
Another satisfied customer of this recipe. I added some fresh horseradish root to my batch. I can't wait to get my meat grinder/sausage stuffer in the mail so I can pair it up with some homemade bratwurst.

Who would have thought that making your own, quality mustard would be so easy and cheap!