Author Topic: beer gas  (Read 4573 times)

Offline brewsumore

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2011, 09:31:07 PM »
At the bottom of page 240 of "How to Brew", in his discussion on the two unfermentables in beer that contribute to body, namely unfermentable sugars and proteins, Palmer mentions that dextrins (carbohydrates that are long chain sugars) are suspected by some brewers to be the leading cause of beer farts.


It makes sense to me that mashing lower to create a more fermentable wort could solve the problem, or is worth trying, so that the beer's sugars are broken down in your stomach rather than in your intestines. 

Offline bluesman

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2011, 09:34:43 PM »
At the bottom of page 240 of "How to Brew", in his discussion on the two unfermentables in beer that contribute to body, namely unfermentable sugars and proteins, Palmer mentions that dextrins (carbohydrates that are long chain sugars) are suspected by some brewers to be the leading cause of beer farts.
It makes sense to me that mashing lower to create a more fermentable wort could solve the problem, or is worth trying, so that the beer's sugars are broken down in your stomach rather than in your intestines. 

This is what I understand to be the leading cause of beer gas.

We should have a contest.  ;D
Ron Price

Offline jeffy

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #32 on: March 11, 2011, 05:02:14 AM »
At the bottom of page 240 of "How to Brew", in his discussion on the two unfermentables in beer that contribute to body, namely unfermentable sugars and proteins, Palmer mentions that dextrins (carbohydrates that are long chain sugars) are suspected by some brewers to be the leading cause of beer farts.
It makes sense to me that mashing lower to create a more fermentable wort could solve the problem, or is worth trying, so that the beer's sugars are broken down in your stomach rather than in your intestines. 

This is what I understand to be the leading cause of beer gas.

We should have a contest.  ;D


You just made me imagine a conference room full of people testing that theory at the NHC in San Diego.
Not a pleasant thought.
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Offline hokerer

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2011, 07:25:03 AM »
You just made me imagine a conference room full of people testing that theory at the NHC in San Diego.
Not a pleasant thought.

Maybe... then again, it might be entertaining enough to make the trip worthwhile
Joe

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #34 on: March 11, 2011, 07:46:23 AM »
Quote
You just made me imagine a conference room full of people testing that theory at the NHC in San Diego.

Easy to imagine. I call it "club night."
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline oscarvan

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #35 on: March 11, 2011, 09:49:05 AM »
Can the starches in beans be converted......?
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Offline brewsumore

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #36 on: March 11, 2011, 09:54:13 AM »
Can the starches in beans be converted......?

Are you suggesting that the OP put Beano in his wort?  :o

Offline dbeechum

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #37 on: March 11, 2011, 10:35:06 AM »
Easy to imagine. I call it "club night."

Thank god we'll have a 41k sq. ft room to have club night in this year - that should be enough for elbow and gas room!
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Offline bluesman

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #38 on: March 11, 2011, 11:31:58 AM »
Easy to imagine. I call it "club night."

Thank god we'll have a 41k sq. ft room to have club night in this year - that should be enough for elbow and gas room!

Hey Drew...do they have a fume hood installed in the banquet room. Hoping so.  ;D
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #39 on: March 11, 2011, 02:21:42 PM »
Can the starches in beans be converted......?

Are you suggesting that the OP put Beano in his wort?  :o

It has been done. People use Beano to make 'light' beer. I have used it to try to dry out an extract RIS that was nasty sweet and ended up with bottle bombs (Well one bottle bomb).

Oscar, Yes the starches in beans can be converted. either via beano if you are going to eat them. or, if one was so inclined, via diastatic malt in a mash. (you would have to cook them first). Bean beer. mmmm.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline brewsumore

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #40 on: March 11, 2011, 03:36:53 PM »
I actually am aware that people use Beano (I don't recommend it), and I can definitely relate to what happened to you.  One batch some years ago when I was pretty new to all-grain brewing, I was using a small-face dial thermometer and must have misplaced my reading glasses -- I mis-read the thermometer, and mashed way too hot.  With all the partially converted sugars in that wort, of course it just wouldn't ferment very low at all, so I added amylase enzyme powder straight from the jar.  I bottled when it got to around 1.002, but it still continued to drop in the bottle and I ended up with gusher-infected jet fuel and dumped 100 bottles, luckily before any exploded.  Experiences like that teach you to master the details!


Can the starches in beans be converted......?

Are you suggesting that the OP put Beano in his wort?  :o

It has been done. People use Beano to make 'light' beer. I have used it to try to dry out an extract RIS that was nasty sweet and ended up with bottle bombs (Well one bottle bomb).

Oscar, Yes the starches in beans can be converted. either via beano if you are going to eat them. or, if one was so inclined, via diastatic malt in a mash. (you would have to cook them first). Bean beer. mmmm.


Offline morticaixavier

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Re: beer gas
« Reply #41 on: March 11, 2011, 11:20:46 PM »
aside from the one bottle that popped that RIS turned out okay. It was a little overwhelming but...
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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