Author Topic: High gravity tangerine mead  (Read 4594 times)

Offline Bad Brewer

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Re: High gravity tangerine mead
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2011, 01:12:30 PM »
Yeah, it got O2 additions at 12 and 24 hours, with nutrient additions at both of those points, also nutrients added when at 5 days.  The super high gravity more or less requires it I think.  It has been actively fermenting, constant bubbling for 12 days, started going at about 4 hours after the initial yeast pitch. 

I was planning on adding Lavlin EC-1118 when it hit the 14% ABV mark, maybe I will up my second yeast addition to about 600billion cells, add more nutrient than planned, and do it sooner.  Its sitting at 7.7% ABV now (1.159 to 1.101).

I will definitely keep swirling it a few times a day.

Thanks everyone for the input, I'll keep this updated as it progresses.


Offline Bad Brewer

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Re: High gravity tangerine mead
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2011, 01:22:03 PM »
Last thought - with the next batch you might try cutting the OG in half.  In addition to being cheaper, a drinkable 8% ABV version would beat the hell out of a dumped batch.  When you think the recipe for the 8% version is perfected, try a 10%, then a 12% and maybe a 14% version.  cheers, j

Yeah, I have made three batches in the last two years with target ABV of 8-10%. (mostly its beer for me, not a lot of wine/mead)  Just straight up traditional meads.  The high gravity/ABV version of this tangerine mead was very enjoyable the first time I made it, was hoping to pass out a few bottles this christmas.  Ahh well, there is still time  ;D  Live and learn, be that much wiser the next time around.

The input is very much appreciated, thanks!



Offline Bad Brewer

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Re: High gravity tangerine mead
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2011, 04:25:34 PM »
So, 24 days, ABV is up to 12%.  That is a little behind where I would have expected it at this point.  Have managed the pH well, it has stayed 3.2-3.7 with no intervention after my initial water modification.  Yeast appear healthy, still have strong activity with constant bubbling.  No vinegar aroma/taste and no signs of bacterial or mold contamination.

But I think I'm going to have to dump it.....

The ethyl acetate aroma, sharp and solventy, is now the dominant odor.  Taste as well.  Overwhelming now that it has dried out some, less honey left to mask it.  I don't think it is salvageable now.

So, the take away is... treat 71B like I would treat the Chimay yeast?  Pitch at 60, don't let it run higher than 62-64?  71B's listed temp range, from Lalvin, is 59F-86F, but two days at 74 seems to have produced an overwhelming quantity of solvent like aroma and taste.  Next time I use this yeast I'll definitely be running it at the cold end!

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: High gravity tangerine mead
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2011, 04:48:12 PM »
I still wouldn't toss it if you have a place to age it.  Keep it on the yeast, some of that stuff will age out.

Worst case, if you can, keg it.  Run an airstone to the bottom of the keg and then trickle CO2 through it for a couple of days, I've heard they do that with wine to help push the ethyl acetate out of the finished product.  Actually i heard they do it with air, but that seems like a bad idea if you have CO2 handy and plan to carbonate anyway.  I think it's worth a shot.
Tom Schmidlin

jaybeerman

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Re: High gravity tangerine mead
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2011, 05:26:34 PM »
So, 24 days, ABV is up to 12%.  That is a little behind where I would have expected it at this point.  Have managed the pH well, it has stayed 3.2-3.7 with no intervention after my initial water modification.  Yeast appear healthy, still have strong activity with constant bubbling.  No vinegar aroma/taste and no signs of bacterial or mold contamination.

But I think I'm going to have to dump it.....

The ethyl acetate aroma, sharp and solventy, is now the dominant odor.  Taste as well.  Overwhelming now that it has dried out some, less honey left to mask it.  I don't think it is salvageable now.

So, the take away is... treat 71B like I would treat the Chimay yeast?  Pitch at 60, don't let it run higher than 62-64?  71B's listed temp range, from Lalvin, is 59F-86F, but two days at 74 seems to have produced an overwhelming quantity of solvent like aroma and taste.  Next time I use this yeast I'll definitely be running it at the cold end!

IIRC ken schramm recommends not allowing a must to go below ph3.5, if/when it does to correct back up to ph3.8. Low ph contributes to slow fermentation. When I brought up ethyl acetate, I was just stating that it was a possibility.  The take away is...in general start lower and end higher.  White wines are typically fermented cooler than red wine yeasts.  I've never had to dump a batch so I have no advice in that department. Raise the ph back to 3.8 and see what happens.  Age this thing and forget about what it smells like for the moment and get your next batch started.  good luck and cheers, j