Author Topic: Caveman Brewing  (Read 3527 times)

Offline euge

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2011, 11:12:18 PM »
Do a test batch with a thermometer and watch the water.  It becomes very glassy at a point, and that is a good time to add your malt.  I've noticed it in my mash tun when heating the water, but might not recognize it if I were just watching for it.  Give it a try and see what you think.

Interesting, I never thought to look at the water.  I always listen to it.  At our elevation (4800ft), there's an audible change at about 162f (which is nice for making tea and could be useful for a caveman strike temp).  I guess the temp of the audible change might be different at your elevation, but I would think it would be within 10 degrees +/- which would still be a pretty good strike temp.  Just a thought

Mine makes low sighing sound but it gets louder and some times makes a few weird knocking sounds when it gets in the 180's.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline punatic

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2011, 01:59:23 AM »
If it's a style you've brewed a lot already I'm betting you can get pretty close on all marks from the memory of past brewing sessions. 

I think this will help you to see the effects of your brewing techniques as compared to depending on measurement crutches.  Use your senses to find your marks. (Zen brewing  ;) )  "Be the beer Grasshopper!"
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Offline uisgue

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2011, 06:44:15 AM »
Two parts boiling water plus one part 60 degree water should put you at about 160 degrees. If your ground water is colder than that, you could adjust the proportions.
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Offline tygo

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2011, 07:17:08 AM »
Two parts boiling water plus one part 60 degree water should put you at about 160 degrees. If your ground water is colder than that, you could adjust the proportions.

But then you'd have to use a thermometer to measure the temperature of the ground water.  Cavemen didn't have thermometers. 
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Offline punatic

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2011, 08:17:42 AM »
Two parts boiling water plus one part 60 degree water should put you at about 160 degrees. If your ground water is colder than that, you could adjust the proportions.

But then you'd have to use a thermometer to measure the temperature of the ground water.  Cavemen didn't have thermometers. 

Maybe they did.  They had automobile insurance...
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Offline hamiltont

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2011, 08:24:41 AM »
So... Taking it to the next step.  How would a caveman store & serve his beer?  Cheers!!!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline punatic

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2011, 08:31:42 AM »
So... Taking it to the next step.  How would a caveman store & serve his beer?  Cheers!!!

In steins.
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Offline chumley

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2011, 08:40:46 AM »
If it's a style you've brewed a lot already I'm betting you can get pretty close on all marks from the memory of past brewing sessions. 

I think this will help you to see the effects of your brewing techniques as compared to depending on measurement crutches.  Use your senses to find your marks. (Zen brewing  ;) )  "Be the beer Grasshopper!"

That is why I think I can do this....I have brewed so many 1.050 beers with 10 lbs. of malt, be it pilsners, APAs, best bitter, weizens, etc., that I think I can do this in my sleep.

The sound of the water heating up, and the look of it (gassy, from the flame hitting the bottom of the kettle) has me guessing the strike temperature about +/- 5° when I subsequently meaure it. It has emboldened me to do this.

Think I will do an APA...seems like I could just add handfuls of C-hops near the end of the boil, and it will turn out okay.

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2011, 11:16:47 AM »
But then you'd have to use a thermometer to measure the temperature of the ground water.  Cavemen didn't have thermometers. 

Why would you need a thermometer?  Og the Caveman make batch, analyze the final product, adjust accordingly (hmm, this beer not so good, next time Og use 2.5to1 ratio rather than 2to1).

So... Taking it to the next step.  How would a caveman store & serve his beer?  Cheers!!!
.

In the cave, I would assume.  Caves tend to be dark and cool, usually around 50 degrees year round.  Of course the beer would be served straight from the fermenter, maybe slightly effervescent from fermentation.

Chumley, this is a great thread/idea.  cheers, j

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2011, 11:44:55 AM »
So... Taking it to the next step.  How would a caveman store & serve his beer?  Cheers!!!
Based on historical brews, a caveman probably drank the beer after 2-3 days with grains still in it. ;)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline euge

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2011, 11:47:36 AM »
So... Taking it to the next step.  How would a caveman store & serve his beer?  Cheers!!!
Based on historical brews, a caveman probably drank the beer after 2-3 days with grains still in it. ;)

Caveman probably drank mead.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #26 on: March 18, 2011, 11:50:46 AM »
So... Taking it to the next step.  How would a caveman store & serve his beer?  Cheers!!!
Based on historical brews, a caveman probably drank the beer after 2-3 days with grains still in it. ;)

Caveman probably drank mead.
"caveman no malt"
Tom Schmidlin

Offline hamiltont

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2011, 11:57:10 AM »
"Caveman no malt"? "Caveman no Braggot!"  :'(
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline bluesman

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #28 on: March 18, 2011, 11:58:36 AM »
"Caveman no malt"? "Caveman no Braggot!"  :'(

"Caveman thirsty"  :P
Ron Price

Offline beersk

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Re: Caveman Brewing
« Reply #29 on: March 18, 2011, 12:46:27 PM »
Right guys...cavemen probably drank water or nothing at all.  You REALLY think they made beer?  ha!  A more realistic name for this type of brewing would be more like Medieval brewing.
Watch out for those Cross Dressing Amateurs!

Jesse