Author Topic: Dry Yeast Question  (Read 1598 times)

Offline KLbrewer

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Dry Yeast Question
« on: March 21, 2011, 07:04:16 AM »
Greetings Forum, I have a few questions and was hoping the group could help me out - as you all have done in the past.  I live in a tropical climate (S.E. Asia) far from any homebrew supply stores and would like to brew a clone of Fuller's London Pride.  The recipe I have calls for Wyeast 1968 or White Labs WLP002; however, do to shipping times and temps, I am unable to get liquid yeast.  So, question #1 is: what is a suitable dry yeast substitute for the above mentioned liquid yeast strains?  Additionally, the recipe calls for 6.6 lbs of light LME, which leads to my second question.  Again, due to shipping restrictions, I am unable to get LME.  So, question #2 is:  What is the correct conversion of 6.6 lbs of light LME to DME?  I've found several equations on other sites, but all differ slightly and I would like your thoughts.  As usual, thanks for your guidance and advice.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2011, 09:48:38 AM »
I've always used this method to convert, and also printed the pdf for my library: http://members.cox.net/steve.krieske/Extract%20Brewing%20Guide.pdf

Grain to LME multiply by .75
Grain to DME multiply by .67
LME to grain divide by .75
DME to grain divide by .67

LME to DME multiply by .89

As far as yeasts, you might try Nottingham or Windsor dry yeasts.  I believe Windsor does not attenuate as fully and is perhaps more fruity.  I don't know how these compare to the liquid strains, but they are reliable dry English yeasts.

Good luck.
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Offline narcout

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2011, 11:18:54 AM »
The recipe I have calls for Wyeast 1968 or White Labs WLP002; however, do to shipping times and temps, I am unable to get liquid yeast.  So, question #1 is: what is a suitable dry yeast substitute for the above mentioned liquid yeast strains?

I would try Safale S-04.

Offline KLbrewer

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2011, 04:51:24 PM »
Great info, thanks guys.
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Offline timberati

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2011, 05:27:46 PM »
The dry yeasts also have a greater recommended fermentation temperature range: Danstar Nottingham strain's range is 14-21C (57-70F) and the range for Danstar Windsor strain's range is 17° to 21°C (64° to 70°F). Windsor will be a bit fruitier than the Nottingham.

However, the Safale 04 might be your best choice for SE Asia. Its recommended fermentation temperature range is 15-24C (59-74F). It looks like a good choice all around.
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Offline narvin

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2011, 05:50:30 AM »
The dry yeasts also have a greater recommended fermentation temperature range: Danstar Nottingham strain's range is 14-21C (57-70F) and the range for Danstar Windsor strain's range is 17° to 21°C (64° to 70°F). Windsor will be a bit fruitier than the Nottingham.

However, the Safale 04 might be your best choice for SE Asia. Its recommended fermentation temperature range is 15-24C (59-74F). It looks like a good choice all around.

I'd ignore those recommended temperatures from the manufacturer.  The yeast might happily ferment anywhere in that range, but you probably won't get the flavor you want.  Definitely pitch cool and I'd try to keep it under 70.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2011, 05:55:48 AM »
The recipe I have calls for Wyeast 1968 or White Labs WLP002; however, do to shipping times and temps, I am unable to get liquid yeast.  So, question #1 is: what is a suitable dry yeast substitute for the above mentioned liquid yeast strains?

I would try Safale S-04.

+1

and ferment it in the low to mid 60's.
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Offline gimmeales

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2011, 07:55:57 AM »
I'd ignore those recommended temperatures from the manufacturer.  The yeast might happily ferment anywhere in that range, but you probably won't get the flavor you want.  Definitely pitch cool and I'd try to keep it under 70.

+1 to this - S-04 can get weird and estery on you even in the upper 60's.  I'd heard this before, but had never experienced it because my ferments are typically ~64F.  Had one Dry Stout that spike to ~69 for only a brief period and two out of three judges at the local pro-am dinged it (a little) for being too fruity.  I would probably not like an S-04 beer that got to 74F.

All the commercially available dry yeast are of high quality.  They are used successfully by many commercial breweries around the world.

Offline KLbrewer

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2011, 04:30:37 PM »
Thanks again guys!  I can control the pitching and fermentation pretty well for the climate I am in - my last batch (american amber) I pitched at 60F and it fermented between 64-68F, according to the stick-on thermometer on the fermenter...fermenter sits in an ice bath.  From what I am reading it looks like I should be ok with pitching close to 60F and fermenting around 66F. Does this sound OK?  And how accurate are the stick-on thermometers?
 
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2011, 04:35:00 PM »
Thanks again guys!  I can control the pitching and fermentation pretty well for the climate I am in - my last batch (american amber) I pitched at 60F and it fermented between 64-68F, according to the stick-on thermometer on the fermenter...fermenter sits in an ice bath.  From what I am reading it looks like I should be ok with pitching close to 60F and fermenting around 66F. Does this sound OK?  And how accurate are the stick-on thermometers?
 

My thought is the lower the better for this yeast as long as you can keep the fermentation active and allow it properly finish.

So pitch at 60F and allow it to warm up on it's own and finish. I use the stick on fermometers and they are fairly accurate but I would measure the pitch temp using a calibrated thermometer.
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Offline KLbrewer

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2011, 04:46:51 PM »
will do, thanks bluesman.  appreciate all the advice.
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Offline ajk

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Re: Dry Yeast Question
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2011, 05:56:52 AM »
I find Safale S-04 to be more like the Whitbread strain -- more bready and attenuative than Wyeast 1968.  I haven't tried Nottingham or Windsor, though, so I can't say from personal experience if they'd get you closer.