Author Topic: Brett in the keg  (Read 163 times)

Offline Brew Cat

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Brett in the keg
« on: July 26, 2017, 04:52:46 AM »
Took 5gal of my ESB and put it in a keg with some Bret c. It obviously carbonated it and tastes great. This was my first attempt. I plan to drink some and bottle off the keg. 2 questions I have. If I don't open the keg and just push my next batch on top would I have issues? Secondly can I just fill a mason jar with some of the beer let it go flat and use it in subsequent batches.

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Offline kramerog

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Re: Brett in the keg
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2017, 07:15:50 AM »
If I don't open the keg and just push my next batch on top would I have issues?
The next batch would become infected with Brett.  Not sure if that answers your question.

Secondly can I just fill a mason jar with some of the beer let it go flat and use it in subsequent batches.
I recommend putting it in a bottle or jug with a fermentation lock so fermentation if any can continue.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Brett in the keg
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2017, 07:33:54 AM »
You could put new beer in the keg. How many brett cells remain would determine how quickly you would see a change in the beer.

You could degas some of the beer and keep it in a mason jar. My first concern is that there is probably a lot more fermentation brett can do on that beer and the mason jar may end up explosively overcarbonated. Mason jars are not designed to withstand internal pressure (although they will, a little). Second, I'd look at how much yeast you have in suspension. A mason jar's worth of beer is probably short on brett cells. You might wait a long time before you see any activity in a keg, especially if the keg remains cold.

IMO the better process would be to buy another package of brett for future batches. You can propagate brett in a starter and pitch from the starter into your kegs. Keep some of the starter behind in a mason jar for future batches. Just make larger starters than you need and keep the excess. This ensures you can control the volume you pitch and that what you pitch is free of sacc.
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Offline Brew Cat

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Re: Brett in the keg
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2017, 01:52:44 PM »
Well I pitched a vial of the Bret to the keg no starter. Since it was a secondary and the beer was at .010 I figured it should be enough. I am going to dedicate that keg for Bret secondary use. I was thinking to do a couple more Brett beers before getting fresh yeast. Easy enough to get more Bret if you don't think I would gain any thing. I also had the idea of leaving a little beer in the keg olde ale style.
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Offline Brew Cat

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Re: Brett in the keg
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2017, 01:58:13 PM »
I see your point about isolating the strain. But if I were pitching another beer using 1968 again it may be alright. If I was making a beer say like a saison I thought about that and would clean out the keg


"The waiting is the hardest part" Tom Petty