Author Topic: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home  (Read 5744 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2011, 07:49:33 AM »
Denny, can you just ask Jess and clear it up?

I'll see what I can do, Gordon, or maybe Tom can.  Whatever it is, it does make a great mild. 
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Offline johnf

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2011, 08:00:06 AM »
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Not that this is necessarily accurate, but Kristen England's Yeast Strain Comparison Chart indicates that London Ale III is the Boddington's strain (despite the "London" Ale name).  IIRC, I don't think the Milk of Manchester is even brewed in Manchester anymore...could be wrong though.  In any case, I suppose what we would be more interested in is where the strain originated.

Not only does Wyeast call it London Ale III but they say it is from a traditional brewery in London. There aren't all that many traditional breweries in London. Boddington's doesn't fit the bill and we know Fuller's is 1968. So either the name and description are inaccurate or the Kris England list is inaccurate.

All this said, Wyeast is the company that calls 34/70 "Bohemian Lager". That isn't terribly inaccurate as 34/70 is probably the most popular lager strain in Bohemia as it is everywhere else lagers are made, but it isn't the best name possible.

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #32 on: March 31, 2011, 08:06:55 AM »
And it's been available at least since the mid-1990s.  Boddingtons might not brew in Manchester and Youngs might not brew in London, but they did then.

The yeast suppliers often clean up or otherwise fiddle with the yeast before they sell it.  So they are often reluctant to say things like "WLPnnn is <brewery's> yeast" so I always ask "Did that yeast originate at that brewery?"

There are a few strains that I know positively the source since I heard it straight from the suppliers.  This isn't one of them, so I would like to know.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

jaybeerman

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #33 on: March 31, 2011, 09:03:43 AM »
Where do you get your yeast?  I assume you've tried asking for wyeast strains?

We have one local homebrew shop and the owner is a great guy, it's just that his profit margin is so slim that he can't afford to stock much of a selection.  Currently, it's easier for him to carry white labs.  I can order yeast from a Salt Lake City brew shop that's only 300 miles away; most of the time the yeast is in good condition when it arrives.  Anyway this is one Wyeast strain that I haven’t had the chance to use. cheers, j

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #34 on: March 31, 2011, 09:20:21 AM »
Denny, can you just ask Jess and clear it up?

I'll see what I can do, Gordon, or maybe Tom can.  Whatever it is, it does make a great mild. 
I sent an email to Doss, I'll let you know what he says.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #35 on: March 31, 2011, 10:12:19 AM »
Thanks, Tom.  Tell Greg I said hi.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #36 on: March 31, 2011, 10:53:49 AM »
Thanks, Tom.  Tell Greg I said hi.
As always ;)
Tom Schmidlin

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #37 on: March 31, 2011, 11:41:42 AM »
Fwiw, I brew a boddingtons clone every year or so using London Ale III. It makes a respectable clone, IMO, even if it's not the actual Boddingtons strain.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #38 on: March 31, 2011, 03:02:21 PM »
1318 should be very similar to Young's.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #39 on: March 31, 2011, 03:22:37 PM »
1318 should be very similar to Young's.

Gold star for Gordon!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #40 on: March 31, 2011, 04:21:08 PM »
See?  Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Thanks for following up.  It's nice to avoid weeks of speculation and thousands of lives by just asking someone at the source.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

jaybeerman

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #41 on: March 31, 2011, 05:14:56 PM »
See?  Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Thanks for following up.  It's nice to avoid weeks of speculation and thousands of lives by just asking someone at the source.

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet" - isn't that the truth.  Nicely done!  cheers to all involved.  Wait a sec...damn, now I'm going to have to call them myself to make sure Tom's telling the truth.

Offline blatz

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #42 on: March 31, 2011, 05:20:22 PM »
See?  Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Thanks for following up.  It's nice to avoid weeks of speculation and thousands of lives by just asking someone at the source.

That's a bit of a problem, because a lot of folks think of Kristens chart as the final word  :-\
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #43 on: March 31, 2011, 05:35:09 PM »
There's a lot of people who think you can't make a beer without a spreadsheet, too.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
« Reply #44 on: March 31, 2011, 06:32:25 PM »
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Not that this is necessarily accurate, but Kristen England's Yeast Strain Comparison Chart indicates that London Ale III is the Boddington's strain (despite the "London" Ale name).  IIRC, I don't think the Milk of Manchester is even brewed in Manchester anymore...could be wrong though.  In any case, I suppose what we would be more interested in is where the strain originated.

What have we learned, gents?  That disclaimers preserve one's credibility!   ;D :P
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