Author Topic: What are the practical effects of mashing too low?  (Read 7191 times)

Offline Kaiser

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Re: What are the practical effects of mashing too low?
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2009, 07:11:48 PM »
I had a number of mashes where time, temp and pH were ok but I needed to
take action on a positive iodine test. Granted, these weren't 2-row mashes but mashes with
lots of dark Munich malt.

Kai

Offline jimbo44

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Re: What are the practical effects of mashing too low?
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2009, 12:14:09 PM »
As long as I'm over 141, can I mash too long?  O

Overnight is a long time.  I'm assuming conversion happened within the first 60-90 min.  Is there benefit to prolonging a mash if conversion is completed? 

If there is no harm in an extra long mash then why bother mashing out at 168.  why not mash out at 150 or whatever your mash temp was?
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Offline a10t2

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Re: What are the practical effects of mashing too low?
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2009, 01:34:30 PM »
Mashing out denatures the enzymes and therefore locks in the ratio of fermentable/unfermentable sugars. If you take a long time to sparge (as in fly sparging) or let the mash sit a long time (as in an overnight mash), then polysaccharides will continue to break down as long as it's within the effective temperature range. The result being a very attenuative wort.
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