Author Topic: I'm confused  (Read 3894 times)

Offline tumarkin

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2011, 03:44:48 AM »
Odd, because the consensus was that the off taste was as a result of carbonic acid. Once it was blown off, that over powering flavor dissipated. Now since the reintroduction of co2, albeit at lower volumes it seems to be returning. If not co2 what could it be?

you weren't able to describe the flavor to us very well. carbonation is a possibility, seems to fit, but......

do you have a keg of another beer without this flavor? if so, you might over-carb that beer and see if it has the same flavor to your taste. if so, then that nails down carbonation as the problem. if not, it's probably something else specific to that one beer. do you have a homebrew club in your area or other access to BJCP trained judges? try to get their opinion. it's difficult to diagnose digitally without better descriptions.
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

Offline whitey

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2011, 11:43:05 AM »
Sadly I dont have a brew club near to where I live. I do have a second keg, a dark wheat which is just fine. The closey description to the taste would be rubbing alcohol. Let me ask this: is a Tripel an ale? Woild a high APV beer need special considerations?
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Offline tumarkin

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2011, 11:50:31 AM »
yes, a tripel is an ale. no, a high abv beer doesn't need special consideration in kegging.

however, your rubbing alcohol description leads me to believe you may have some fusels or higher alcohols. though, that wouldn't generally go away with lower carbonation. puzzling. for the future, higher alcohols are more prevalent with warmer fermentation temps. so get your beer down to low 60's before you pitch the yeast, and try to keep the ferm temps below 68-70 in the future.
Mark Tumarkin
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Gainesville, FL

Offline whitey

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2011, 01:11:01 PM »
The pitch temp was about 68F, and the Ferm temp was a steady 64F.

What's your opinion on natural fermentation in a keg and only using CO2 to serve?
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Offline denny

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2011, 01:25:05 PM »
If by "natural fermentation in a keg", it works fine but you end up with a bunch of sediment in the keg.  You need CO2 anyway to serve so why not use it to carb?  CO2 is CO2 no matter what the source, so there is no difference in beer flavor between the 2.
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Offline tumarkin

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2011, 01:31:33 PM »
The pitch temp was about 68F, and the Ferm temp was a steady 64F.

What's your opinion on natural fermentation in a keg and only using CO2 to serve?

you've got a puzzler here. at those temps you shouldn't get a lot of fusels or higher alcohols. for the future you might try to cool it just a bit more before pitching your yeast. the ferm temp has a tendency to rise over the ambient temp. sounds like this wasn't the problem here, but still.

on fermenting in the keg..... no difference as far as the carbonation is concerned, though it is harder to control in getting a desired specific level of carbonation. you do end up with more trub in your keg, but that's usually not much of a problem. folks that do it regularly generally cut a bit off the dip tube to better insure that the trub is left behind. but as Denny points out, carbonation is carbonation. you're going to need a tank & regulator to serve the beer anyhow, so it seems better to me to take advantage of the ttank to get your beer carbonated exactly to the level you like.
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

Offline whitey

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2011, 01:57:56 PM »
I understand the concept of CO2 being CO2. My concern is that I over carbed the Tripel, is it possible to over carb naturally? or does the beer hit some sort of equilibrium and stop carbing?
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Offline whitey

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2011, 02:00:54 PM »
The only other thing I can think of is that I may not have cleared the keg of O2.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2011, 02:06:51 PM »
I understand the concept of CO2 being CO2. My concern is that I over carbed the Tripel, is it possible to over carb naturally? or does the beer hit some sort of equilibrium and stop carbing?

It sure is possible. If you give it too much sugar it will over carb. In a keg, not such a big deal, you bleed a little off and your good to go. in a bottle... BOOM. well, potentially at least.

Could it be an issue of stressed yeast?
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Offline jeffy

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2011, 02:14:12 PM »
Ya know, a strong beer takes a little time to mellow out.  Sometimes when they are young you can get a solventy type flavor that dissipates in a few weeks.  You don't taste it in the bottled beer because they were bottle-conditioned - a bit sweeter when young from the sugar, but when carbonated the bottles have been aged a bit longer than what you have in the keg.  Does that make any sense?
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Offline whitey

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2011, 02:43:54 PM »
Yes, it does. I'm sorry to keep asking questions, because I've already tossed a tripel due to this off flavour, I really need to solve this.

When I first kegged it, it tasted bloody amazing, Now, it tastes mediocre.
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Offline denny

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2011, 02:52:27 PM »
I understand the concept of CO2 being CO2. My concern is that I over carbed the Tripel, is it possible to over carb naturally? or does the beer hit some sort of equilibrium and stop carbing?

It's much harder to accurately control the carb level via priming than it is through force carbing.
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Offline denny

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2011, 02:53:21 PM »
The only other thing I can think of is that I may not have cleared the keg of O2.

That would have a completely different effect than what you described.
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Offline whitey

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2011, 04:50:48 AM »
What sort of effect would it have?
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Offline narvin

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Re: I'm confused
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2011, 06:29:26 AM »
Most Tripels are highly carbonated, so I can't believe that too much carbonation is causing the problem.

One thing about kegging is that you get all the yeast and hop sediment in the first pours, while when bottling it stays at the bottom.  Are you sure this harshness isn't something that is just less noticeable in warm or flat beer?
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