Author Topic: Help with a Roggenbier water profile  (Read 2310 times)

Offline akr71

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Help with a Roggenbier water profile
« on: November 18, 2009, 08:47:34 AM »
I'm brewing a Roggenbier next week and I'm not really where to start for a water profile.  Should model it after a wheat beer?

My water (ppm)
Ca 12.2
Mg 1.2
Na 8.1
Cl 19
SO4 73
Alkilinity 134

pH 8.4

If I remember correctly (my log book is at home), for my wheat beer it cut it with 75% RO water and add a bit of Calcium Chloride (quater of a teaspoon) to bring the Chlorides and Sulphates into balance.

Comments or suggestions?
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada

Offline akr71

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Re: Help with a Roggenbier water profile
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2009, 10:57:21 AM »
Nobody has any insight on this?

I know everybody loves Denny's RIPA - and I'm sure I will too, once I try it, but I want to see what rye malt actually adds to the beer, before I throw a bunch of hops on it  :-[

Anyway, with a little more research, I decided to aim for a water profile close to Munich.  With 75% RO water and some chalk, baking soda and calcium chloride I can get within +/- 20 ppm of a Munich profile for the major ions.

I plan on fermenting with wyeast 3068 and keeping it in the high 50's to supress the clove esters.
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada

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Re: Help with a Roggenbier water profile
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2009, 11:01:50 AM »
I'm brewing a Roggenbier next week and I'm not really where to start for a water profile.  Should model it after a wheat beer?

Yes, I'd use the same profile you would use for a wheat beer. Munich water might be too alkaline unless you plan to use dark malts.

Kai

Offline akr71

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Re: Help with a Roggenbier water profile
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2009, 11:28:43 AM »
I'm brewing a Roggenbier next week and I'm not really where to start for a water profile.  Should model it after a wheat beer?

Yes, I'd use the same profile you would use for a wheat beer. Munich water might be too alkaline unless you plan to use dark malts.

Kai

Thaks Kai!  I'm not using anything too dark - mostly rye and munich and a little cara-munich (again, the recipe is on the home computer, so I'm going by memory here).

I guess the thing I find most confusing about water chemistry is knowing what to shoot for.  Sure, I can find the numbers for a water profile from many regions, especially ones with historic links to brewing, but that doesn't mean that the brewers there don't alter their water...  ???
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada

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Re: Help with a Roggenbier water profile
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2009, 11:48:38 AM »
I guess the thing I find most confusing about water chemistry is knowing what to shoot for.  Sure, I can find the numbers for a water profile from many regions, especially ones with historic links to brewing, but that doesn't mean that the brewers there don't alter their water...  ???

I get that question on occasions. My suggestion for almost any German beer is to keep the water fairly soft. That means shoot for about 50-80 ppm Ca, ~10 ppm Mg and a RA that works for your grist. I think in your case, w/o seeing the recipe, an RA of 0-30 ppm as CaCO3 should work.

To brew lighter beers, Munich brewers would decarbonate their water with lime and/or use lactic acid in the mash.

Kai

Offline akr71

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Re: Help with a Roggenbier water profile
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2009, 11:55:22 AM »
This is getting printed and put in my log book!
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada