Author Topic: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...  (Read 12533 times)

Offline bluesman

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #90 on: April 14, 2011, 05:05:27 pm »
I like turtles.

...with or without tacos.  :-\
Ron Price

ccarlson

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #91 on: April 14, 2011, 05:45:11 pm »
I like turtles.

You've obviously never had one bite you.

Offline punatic

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #92 on: April 14, 2011, 05:53:24 pm »
Motorcycles work exactly the same as bicycles
Dang!  No WONDER I get so fricken tired trying to pedal mine up steep hills!  ;)  lol

You ride a moped?
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #93 on: April 14, 2011, 05:53:40 pm »

Absolutely.  IMO, motorcycle riding teaches you the perfect combination of defensive & agressive driving - in other words, knowing when to play things cautious/safe and when to crank the throttle to get yourself up/ahead/away-from/out of a potentially dangerous situation. 


That's called a "Trial by Fire."  Learn or die.

"Combining both brakes won't stop you faster"  Yeah, WRONG.  ::)

Only wrong if you can somehow keep the rear wheel fully seated on the ground under MAXIMUM braking force.  I don't mean "Touching but gliding," I mean "Firmly planted."  If what is called a "stoppie" is physically possible, then using only the front brake in the most efficient way possible provides 100% of the maximum stopping power.



You have this kind of braking force up front.  What can the rear wheel possibly add?  The above is too much braking; use less front braking force, just enough to make the rear wheel glide over the surface of the road.

The maximum braking force of the front wheel on an upright bicycle (not motorcycle) is about 0.5g (i.e. 4.9 m/s^2 or 16ft/s^2), while the maximum braking force of the rear wheel alone is 0.1g (i.e. 0.981m/s^2 or 3.2ft/s^2).  The more force applied up front, the more weight comes off the rear wheel, thus the less friction produced by stopping the rear wheel (friction is friction coefficient times perpendicular force), thus at i.e. 0.4g you have absolutely no more than 0.02g stopping force in the back, and 0.42 is less than 0.5.  Be mindful you can lift the rear wheel by the 0.5 mark, so you haven't maximized front brake efficiency until you've eliminated rear wheel braking force entirely.  Maximum stopping force is at roughly 11% slippage in any condition, but the fact that the wheel is able to deadstop and flip the bike over it if the rider slides forward (if you push on the handlebars and stay seated, this likely won't happen) indicates that the front wheel is NOT skidding (at which point there is little braking force).

In various situations, front braking is undesirable.  On bumpy terrain (ill-maintained roads etc), you can throw the bike either forward or in a random direction (loss of control); use partial rear braking.  On long descents down huge hills you can overheat a wheel, inflating a tube beyond maximum pressure and causing a blow; modulate the brakes between front and back to allow heat radiation.  Of course if the front wheel is blown, stop with the rear.  In slippery conditions, more control can be had with some rear braking, sometimes; more braking force can usually be had due to lack of friction limiting efficiency to a point that the rear will not lift off the ground (at least not as soon), and indeed it's the total force that causes slippage (thus the rear wheel can reach more of its maximum braking power than the front wheel, since its maximum braking force is lower).

Motorcycles are not bicycles.  Motorcycles work exactly the same as bicycles; however, they are larger, heavier, faster, have a better contact patch with the ground, etc.  Sam exact dynamics, but the numbers we're using here are much different.  Launching a motorcycle end over end by locking the front brake is easier going 80mph, and seating yourself firmly won't help.  The only reason a bicycle flips is because the rider goes forward into the handlebars; without this momentum, the bicycle's weight distribution with the rider makes flipping a bike on level ground impossible, and difficult coming down hill (wear your helmet).  The bike weighs about 6 pounds; the motorcycle weighs about 6 times what you do.  The motorcycle will not only effectively ignore your weight (puny flesh sack), but also will have much more powerful brakes, much more momentum, and much more raw speed.  In other news, you can't bunny hop a motorcycle by pulling up with your hands and legs.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0262731541/

This is apparently the most up to date casual book on the topic of bicycle and motorcycle dynamics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnHmskwqCCQ
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Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #94 on: April 15, 2011, 02:59:54 pm »
So three days (last Thursday, this Monday, this Friday i.e. today) from nothing.  Today I found out there's a bike trail next to the road I take to work, paved, so I took that.  I learned three things:

  • Skip the first off-turn.  There's a path up a hill a little to jump back onto the bike path.  There's also a paved path before that going up a hill about a mile, and then into the freaking mountains, on crushed stone and mud.  I have a road bike.
  • The right way is 8 miles.  I knew "the trip to work" was 8 miles.  This was incorrect, as (due to my incorrect selection of bike path) my odometer read 31.04 leaving and 43.77 chaining it up at work.  By the way, I'm barely "winded," I can still walk--I can even walk straight if I keep the first, third, and seventh chakra open!
  • Proper gearing.  I read this online, how to pedal, keep proper cadence, etc.  I did that, only stopped pedaling around 90RPM when going down a steep grade in an area that I was unsure of terrain (and control/stopping ability) and thus modulated my brakes.  It was easier, I guess; somehow I made it 12.74 miles in 60 minutes.
Well, my suspension is coming; next week I'm buying a Brooks leather seat (N17 Imperial); and I just made a pedal upgrade:





I've never been that guy, you know, who put the cold air intake on the car, the upgraded air filter, high-flow catalytic converter, a straighter exhaust pipe, and a high-flow muffler, just to squeeze that last 5HP out.

But I've never been the engine before, either.

Harder shoes and a solid mechanical connection to improve power transfer efficiency... yeah, I'll take that.  That's extremely significant.

Offline maxieboy

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #95 on: April 15, 2011, 03:25:27 pm »
+1 on the clipless pedals and shoes. The only way to fly.
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ccarlson

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #96 on: April 15, 2011, 03:35:17 pm »

Offline beersk

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #97 on: April 15, 2011, 04:00:11 pm »
Right on man.  Clipless pedals are definitely nice.  But in my opinion, for most around town/commuting purposes, they aren't warranted.  I ride clipless on my commute typically, but don't always feel the need.  Sure you can go faster and put in more effort, but my goal is to get from point A to point B, not necessarily get the best workout I can get.  While I'm getting a good workout, I don't want to sweat like crazy, especially on super hot days.  So I usually take it fairly easy, riding maybe 60-75%.  In the winter time though, I'll pretty much ride 90-100% effort, which gets me in pretty good shape come springtime.  
For around town stuff, I ride a fixed gear with toe clips and Adidas Sambas; great combination.
And definitely find a route that is more enjoyable to ride, even if it's longer.  You'll likely stick with commuting to work if you enjoy your ride to work.  If that means taking a route that is a mile or two longer but with significantly less traffic or steep-ass hills, then do it.  I have 3 routes to choose from: the short 3.5 mile hilly ass route, the more traffic ridden, slightly hillier 4.5 mile route, or the hardly any traffic, few hills, 5.5 mile route.  
If I'm running late, I take the short route, if it's windy as hell or snowing I take the middle route (because there are more building and trees to block wind, and it's on streets where the snow/ice will be cleared typically), if it's nice out I take the long route.  Nice having options, never get bored of riding to work.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2011, 04:02:53 pm by beersk »
Jesse

Offline riverrat

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #98 on: April 15, 2011, 04:07:57 pm »
Did you mean B17 on the saddle?  I've never heard of the N17.  Another option would be to go with the flyer (I recall you mentioning a thudbuster, so you could skip that with just a flyer):
http://www.brooksengland.com/en/Shop_ProductPage.aspx?cat=saddles+-+touring+%26+trekking&prod=Flyer

I have a b17 and a flyer.  Both are awesome.  The flyer has more use so far, so it fits a bit better.  They do take a bit of saddle time to get them to fit you properly.  A bit of saddle conditioner (Brooks Proofide seems to work well) will help speed up the process.  Just don't go overboard with it, or you will prematurely stretch out the leather.

Good call on going with clipless.  Not sure if you have already bought or not, but I'm a big fan of Time brand pedals.  Extremely durable and easy in/out.

Congrats on commuting with your own power!  The first time is the hardest, and you are well past that.

Good luck with avoiding the overly entitled motorists.

And as far as hauling brew stuff, I have hauled 4 full kegs home from a friends house, 2 sacks of grain (along with other specialties, hops, yeast, etc...) from the brew store, and many other things.  It just takes a long bike.  But I have also hauled a 50 lb sack of corn sugar on the rear rack of my commuter as well.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #99 on: April 15, 2011, 04:15:20 pm »
Problem with B17s...you generally need a fighter escort.  Find something with a higher cruise speed and altitude ceiling, is my recommendation.

Offline gmac

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #100 on: April 15, 2011, 04:20:01 pm »
So...um, not sure where this ended up.  Are you going for a check up or not?

Good friend of mine (42) and very active just spent a week in ICU for his heart and only got out Tuesday.  Up to you but I think it's probably time I paid a visit to the family practioner.

Offline punatic

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #101 on: April 15, 2011, 06:28:35 pm »
If you question the accuracy of your odometer, a small hand-held GPS receiver works well for instantaneous speed, average speed, and distance.  Easy to attach to the bike.  Likely less expensive than those pedals and shoes.
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Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #102 on: April 15, 2011, 07:46:38 pm »
(I recall you mentioning a thudbuster, so you could skip that with just a flyer):

Springs vs parallelogram zero-stiction elastomer tuned specifically to my weight and tastes.  I'll stick with the Thudbuster.  On top of that I think I'll release enough air for a 15% drop in tire height (this won't increase rolling resistance at all).

How the heck did you ever haul 50 pounds of crap on your bike anyway?

Quote from: punatic
If you question the accuracy of your odometer, a small hand-held GPS receiver works well for instantaneous speed, average speed, and distance.  Easy to attach to the bike.  Likely less expensive than those pedals and shoes.

Nods, well my Cateye says this:

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Randolph+Rd&daddr=39.3060329,-76.7285464+to:39.2998509,-76.705534+to:39.2985189,-76.654012+to:39.30118,-76.63173+to:1403+Madison+Ave,+Baltimore,+MD+21217&hl=en&geocode=FVbKVwIdgUxt-w%3BFTDDVwIdHjdt-yl5pACm_hvIiTEOS3764r6Z1g%3BFQqrVwIdApFt-ynhnOxkiRvIiTF189Ov9SDFWA%3BFdalVwIdRFpu-ykF_CMWWhvIiTGaPi3-DgHk5w%3BFTywVwIdTrFu-ymHkJMwsATIiTGC24yR3pwg8Q%3BFVi8VwIdCsBu-ynRnHojugTIiTG-jwuZyobr_g&mra=dpe&mrsp=4&sz=15&via=1,2,3,4&sll=39.29658,-76.649423&sspn=0.033477,0.044246&ie=UTF8&ll=39.306077,-76.72122&spn=0.016736,0.022123&t=h&z=16

(6.8mi) is 8 miles, and this

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=1403+Madison+Ave,+Baltimore,+MD+21217&daddr=39.301065,-76.672832+to:39.30378,-76.6738486+to:39.307919,-76.687919+to:39.30442,-76.69167+to:39.3034947,-76.7142338+to:39.3059452,-76.7285142+to:Randolph+Rd&hl=en&geocode=FVi8VwIdCsBu-ynRnHojugTIiTG-jwuZyobr_g%3BFcmvVwIdwBBu-yndR6BnZBvIiTGa97P2QHCFfQ%3BFWS6VwIdyAxu-yl3OOd5ehvIiTGdbZEzSvJRzQ%3BFY_KVwId0dVt-ynrC_QodhvIiTGBRR9l2sKGqA%3BFeS8VwIdKsdt-yndAM_6ghvIiTGr6prkBHjo3g%3BFUa5VwIdB29t-yktA4M_9BvIiTHjQDwNMwC7jA%3BFdnCVwIdPjdt-yl5pACm_hvIiTEPS3764r6Z1g%3BFVbKVwIdgUxt-w&mra=dpe&mrsp=6&sz=16&via=1,2,3,4,5,6&dirflg=b&sll=39.3044,-76.722615&sspn=0.016737,0.022123&ie=UTF8&ll=39.30367,-76.684377&spn=0.016737,0.022123&t=h&z=16&lci=bike

(8.5mi) is 12.74 miles.

The tech at the bike shop installed, calibrated, and configured my Cateye.  I don't much trust 'em; guess I'll check the configuration.  I'm using 700c x 32h wheels, which should be about 300mm high (plus tires I guess).

http://sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomp_f.html

2155 is the number.

Offline beersk

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #103 on: April 15, 2011, 08:06:28 pm »
Don't worry about all that crap man, just ride.
Jesse

Offline punatic

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Re: Exploding heart in 3, 2, 1...
« Reply #104 on: April 15, 2011, 10:30:44 pm »
Don't worry about all that crap man, just ride.

+1 on just riding.

This is what I use. < $100 everywhere.  I use it for riding, driving, flying, hiking, and getting into and out of the active lava fields when the rain/fog/white-out conditions sneak up on me.  I've had it for 9 years now.  Very accurate, except on elevation.  Elevation wanders.  I think that's on purpose to keep non-friendlies from using GPS for accurate targeting.

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