Author Topic: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine  (Read 1243 times)

Offline pyrite

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Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« on: April 14, 2011, 04:31:00 PM »
I plan on brewing this tomorrow, and am wondering when I should dry hop, before or after extended aging?

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/community/blog/show?title=recipe-of-the-weel-american-barleywine
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beveragebob

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2011, 05:40:14 PM »
Both depending on your process and equipment. 5 lbs dextrin malt .....seriously?

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2011, 06:17:54 PM »
Also, this is a problem:

"Ingredients for 10 U.S. gallons"
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"White Labs WLP 001 California ale yeast (2L starter)"
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"Original Specific Gravity: 1.100"
Tom Schmidlin

Offline pyrite

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2011, 06:41:15 PM »
Don't hate on the Brewer, hate on the recipe.lol :D

Yes I will be adding 5lbs of cara-pils..I want it chewy.....I'll also be aging in a 10gal oak barrel..

I know by dry hopping prior to extended aging I'll get a different flavor than if I dry hop after aging.  However, what is more traditional/ true to style/ or what the style guidelines would accept?
« Last Edit: April 14, 2011, 06:53:41 PM by pyrite »
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Offline pyrite

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2011, 06:54:56 PM »
Also, this is a problem:

"Ingredients for 10 U.S. gallons"
.
.
.
"White Labs WLP 001 California ale yeast (2L starter)"
.
.
.
"Original Specific Gravity: 1.100"

I have a cake all lined up, and ready to go.
If you don't get in over your head, how are you ever going to know how tall you are.

Offline pyrite

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2011, 06:55:31 PM »
Both depending on your process and equipment. 5 lbs dextrin malt .....seriously?

Thanks for the advice!
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2011, 07:45:01 PM »
I would seriously consider using something less than 10 lb (!) of crystal malts.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2011, 09:18:12 AM »
Seriously less crystal!

I just starting tasting a BW that is 100% 2 pale malt with 2 lbs of maple syrup and mashed at 149 and it finished at 1.016 from 1.096. If I had left out the syrup it wouild probably have finished higher and if I had mashed higher...it's plenty chewy. With BW you want most or even all of your caramel character to come from the long boil.
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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2011, 06:35:43 AM »
And for the dry hopping, I would not do that in the oak  but rather in
your serving keg after you take the beer out of the oak. Just easier
to manage the vegetative material in a corney v.s. trying to remove
hop material you may not desire in your oak bbl.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Recipe of the Week: American Barleywine
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2011, 06:45:30 AM »
And for the dry hopping, I would not do that in the oak  but rather in
your serving keg after you take the beer out of the oak. Just easier
to manage the vegetative material in a corney v.s. trying to remove
hop material you may not desire in your oak bbl.

+1

To get the most out of dry hopping, it is always better to add them to the serving keg just prior (1-2 weeks) to serving. The fresher the better IMO.
Ron Price