Author Topic: Getting Cold Feet on A Fest Recipe...  (Read 1459 times)

Offline Kirk

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Re: Getting Cold Feet on A Fest Recipe...
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2011, 08:56:04 PM »
Thanks.  I learned a lot.  I'll check into it further.  Do you get your malts from your local shop, or direct?
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Offline blatz

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Re: Getting Cold Feet on A Fest Recipe...
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2011, 09:19:44 AM »
Do you get your malts from your local shop, or direct?

Both - I get mostly from my local shop but also from North Country Malt, Rebel Brewer and Northern Brewer.
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Offline lupulin5446

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Re: Getting Cold Feet on A Fest Recipe...
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2011, 10:28:51 AM »
An easy festbier recipe:
50% pilsner malt, 5% Weyerman caramunich III, 5% Weyerman carared, 35% light munich malt, 3% acid malt, 2% Weyerman cara-aroma (added at mash out to reduce 'roasted' flavors).  First-wort hop with 22 IBUs from noble hops-preferably Tettnang or Hallertau varieties.  Single infusion mash at 152, boil 90 minutes, O.G. 1.054

pH is very important for this style of beer, both in the mash, and sparge water.  You will want a residual alkalinity as close to 0 as possible, and this can be easily achieved with gypsum and calcium chloride.  The high enzyme content from the pils malt will reduce the mash time.  This combined with the lower pH in the mash will leech fewer tannins from the barley hulls.  Cara-aroma contains no enzyme, so adding it at mash out will extract color and aroma while minimizing roasted notes that would be out of character.  First-wort hopping will enhance the 'noble hop' character. 

Decoction mashes can be fun if you want to brew old-school, but are generally unnecessary with modern malts, unless you have unusually low enzyme content in your mash.  Heffeweizens can benefit from a single or double decoction because of the lower enzyme wheat malt as well as the high protein/glucan content that makes sparging an all-day event.

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Re: Getting Cold Feet on A Fest Recipe...
« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2011, 03:01:56 PM »
I would be skeptical of using some domestic Munich malts, but the beers I've  made with Best, Weyermann, Dingeman's are out of this world.

FWIW, I've been using Cargill Munich lately since it's what we stock at the brewery, and I've been pleasantly surprised.
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