Author Topic: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed  (Read 15636 times)

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #75 on: April 30, 2011, 08:52:57 pm »
I, for one, have a brewers license so I am in the clear.  ;)

Tom Schmidlin said what I want to say better than I ever could.

I guess I should also warn all of us, including myself, not to get too politically sidetracked. Though it's hard to talk about homebrewing legality without brushing up against politics.

The other thing I will say is that I do believe that the homebrewing law is partially backed by Bud lobbyists who don't want to see more craft beer in Alabama. Craft beer is what it is because of homebrewers. And if you take the wind out of the homebrewer's sales you, in turn, take a lot of the wind out of the craft brewers as well. My .02.

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #76 on: April 30, 2011, 08:58:18 pm »
Does that license cover you if your're brewing anywhere off site, IE your home?

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #77 on: April 30, 2011, 09:03:24 pm »
No. It doesn't. It would not be cost effective for homebrewers to consider buying a lic. either.

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #78 on: April 30, 2011, 09:27:57 pm »
No. It doesn't. It would not be cost effective for homebrewers to consider buying a lic. either.

I wasn't heading in that direction.  I was just curious and felt like it probably wouldn't cover home brewing anyway.

Offline tubercle

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #79 on: April 30, 2011, 10:20:16 pm »
Tubercle's take on this...like it matters.

 10th amendment (read for yourselves) - States should be able to choose. I support that. Tubercle believes state law trumps the fed.

 However.....

 Most Bibles in S.C. have holes on the cover from all of the thumping. But, they did adopt the "Jimmy Carter" home brewing laws. I can't imagine the shape Alabama Bibles are in.

  Remember this, all politician's main objective is to get re-elected. They spout all that we're for the people stuff but in  the end they want to get re-elected because this is really a gravy job with benefits none of us will ever realize. I have had the occasion to know and be friends with state legislators and they consulted me several times on various bills that were coming up (I know, scary, isn't it!). Every one of them, every time, were torn between to do what was right and trying to estimate how many registered voters it might offend. They have staff to do the statistics. In the end the voter count wins.

 Find a sympathetic friend to tack this legislation in a noble and voter friendly bill, if state law permits, that they cannot vote against, and let it pass on through.

 That is politics.

 
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #80 on: April 30, 2011, 10:56:24 pm »
No. It doesn't. It would not be cost effective for homebrewers to consider buying a lic. either.

I wasn't heading in that direction.  I was just curious and felt like it probably wouldn't cover home brewing anyway.

If you have a brewery with a wet area, walk in cold room storage, instance hot water heater that can reach dough in temps, and hot water clean up .... it would be kinda silly to still brew at home... just sayin'.  ;)

Offline tubercle

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #81 on: April 30, 2011, 11:09:02 pm »
No. It doesn't. It would not be cost effective for homebrewers to consider buying a lic. either.

I wasn't heading in that direction.  I was just curious and felt like it probably wouldn't cover home brewing anyway.

If you have a brewery with a wet area, walk in cold room storage, instance hot water heater that can reach dough in temps, and hot water clean up .... it would be kinda silly to still brew at home... just sayin'.  ;)

 Just a little side track....Can you take some what you make at the licensed brewery home for your own personal consumption? Or, does all have to be accounted for and taxed and sold through a distributor?

Back to to the post now.
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #82 on: May 01, 2011, 04:31:49 am »
No. It doesn't. It would not be cost effective for homebrewers to consider buying a lic. either.

I wasn't heading in that direction.  I was just curious and felt like it probably wouldn't cover home brewing anyway.

If you have a brewery with a wet area, walk in cold room storage, instance hot water heater that can reach dough in temps, and hot water clean up .... it would be kinda silly to still brew at home... just sayin'.  ;)

Oh, I get it. You work in a brewery. Cool. (I'm a little slow when I've been drinking)
« Last Edit: May 01, 2011, 01:54:19 pm by ccarlson »

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #83 on: May 01, 2011, 06:06:36 am »
yes, Tom, it's all about freedom. but seen from another perspective, those legislators are valiant freedom fighters. they're leading the battle to free us from the yeastie overlords.
;D  I suppose I should thank them then. :)


10th amendment (read for yourselves) - States should be able to choose. I support that. Tubercle believes state law trumps the fed.
Here's the problem with that.  And here and here and here and here.

I'm only trying to be beer-political which I think is a legitimate discussion for the board, but as Keith pointed out, there's carry over . . .

Homebrewing is a matter of privacy, as are a couple of the things I linked to.  I'd be surprised Tubercle, if you actually blindly support a state's right to decide something when it clearly infringes on the privacy or the rights of the individual and where the state has no legitimate interest.

The 10th Amendment is great - read it again, especially those last four words.

States should neither prohibit nor mandate homebrewing.  It is not any of their business.  You're more likely to get sick or die from a jar of home canned tomatoes than a bottle of home brewed beer.  If a state chooses to say you shouldn't be allowed to walk to your neighbor's house with a bottle of homebrew, well, I disagree but at least that is a legitimate issue.

Mods, if this is too politcal, sorry.  Feel free to delete.

I think it's clear where I stand anyway ;D
Tom Schmidlin

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #84 on: May 01, 2011, 12:11:22 pm »
No. It doesn't. It would not be cost effective for homebrewers to consider buying a lic. either.

I wasn't heading in that direction.  I was just curious and felt like it probably wouldn't cover home brewing anyway.

If you have a brewery with a wet area, walk in cold room storage, instance hot water heater that can reach dough in temps, and hot water clean up .... it would be kinda silly to still brew at home... just sayin'.  ;)

 Just a little side track....Can you take some what you make at the licensed brewery home for your own personal consumption? Or, does all have to be accounted for and taxed and sold through a distributor?

Back to to the post now.

The TTB allows you to take home 200 gallons a year, kinda the same as with homebrewing.

ccarlson

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #85 on: May 01, 2011, 12:28:54 pm »
The fact that they allow you to take any home seems fair to me. Is that 200 gallons untaxed?

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #86 on: May 01, 2011, 12:43:37 pm »
Well, first off - that's the TTBs laws. Not Alabama laws. Alabama laws currently state that we are not even  allowed to sample the beer on premises .... guess how realistic that is.  ;)

But I believe the TTB law is that you are taxed only by what is sold. So the 200 gallons to take home is untaxed... I think. That said, I am the brewer and my partner takes care of all the paperwork and taxes and what not. I sent him an email to clarify if that beer is untaxed or not. If it is taxed then, still, doesn't amount to very much. TTB taxes are $7/bbl.

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #87 on: May 01, 2011, 12:47:49 pm »
For a brewer to not be able to legally taste the beer, make absolutely no sense whatsoever. 

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #88 on: May 01, 2011, 01:15:13 pm »
For a brewer to not be able to legally taste the beer, make absolutely no sense whatsoever. 

they can and do taste the beer. a hugely important part of commercial brewing is quality control in all its aspects (brewer evaluation, tasting panels, laboratory work, etc).
Mark Tumarkin
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Re: Alabama Homebrew Legalization 2011 = Failed
« Reply #89 on: May 01, 2011, 01:35:07 pm »
For a brewer to not be able to legally taste the beer, make absolutely no sense whatsoever. 

they can and do taste the beer. a hugely important part of commercial brewing is quality control in all its aspects (brewer evaluation, tasting panels, laboratory work, etc).

That's true but I think Keith's point was that doing that is technically illegal in Alabama
Joe