Author Topic: Water Profile/ Czech Pilsener  (Read 346 times)

Offline HopDen

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Water Profile/ Czech Pilsener
« on: December 18, 2019, 12:47:38 AM »
Suggestions for Czech Lager water profile. I use BS3. BJCP15 claims to use very soft water/Pilsen profile which is
TDS 35ppm
Carbonates 15
Ca 7
SO4 5
Mg 2
Na 2
Cl 2

The thing that is confusing to me is that I usually will have, at a minimum for Ca, 50ppm for most beers and the profile suggests 7. I think that is too low because we really don't know what the brewers did to their water once it reaches the brewery.


I honestly struggle with water chemistry and I am thinking I should just use a yellow balanced profile.

Any thoughts/suggestions are greatly appreciated!


Offline Robert

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Re: Water Profile/ Czech Pilsener
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2019, 01:14:35 AM »



 we really don't know what the brewers did to their water once it reaches the brewery.


Exactly.  We also cannot assume that their well or other source is anything like the city water supply reflected in such reports.  In brewing any style, it is best to make your water first suit the needs of the brewing process, and secondarily any desired flavor effects.  That is surely what the brewers have done.

(Specifically with respect to Pilsen, the 19th- early 20th century brewing scientist Thausing reported numerous brewing water analyses from the various brewhouses of Pilsen, and none closely resembles the popular profile you cite; and it is well known that the brewers have always added salts and otherwise treated their water.)

So go ahead and do what you feel is best for your beer.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Water Profile/ Czech Pilsener
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2019, 02:09:58 AM »
For pale lagers, I use something more like a boiled Munich profile. However, I do add all the mineral additions for the entire batch to the mashing water. That technique temporarily raises the Calcium content to at least 40 ppm in the mash so that oxalate is precipitated. I use RO for sparging and that ends up diluting the overall calcium content back down into the 20 range. Lager yeast can be adversely affected by too much calcium. Low calcium is desirable for lager brewing.
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Offline roger

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Re: Water Profile/ Czech Pilsener
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2019, 03:46:38 PM »
I have been curious about this issue since switching to a no-sparge (BrewEasy) system. Adding the same salts as Martin uses in his mash to my system's mash will result in a lower concentration of ions due to the increased quantity of water. But this will result in the same concentration of ions into the fermenter.

If I would increase the salt quantities to compensate for the additional water, my mash water would contain similar concentration of ions, but the wort into the fermenter will contain higher concentrations. This seems necessary (at least to about 40 ppm calcium) due to Martin's statement regarding precipitating oxalates in the mash.

But it seems to me that I am missing something. Any help, as always, is appreciated.
Cheers,

Roger

Offline HopDen

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Re: Water Profile/ Czech Pilsener
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2019, 09:42:29 PM »
For pale lagers, I use something more like a boiled Munich profile. However, I do add all the mineral additions for the entire batch to the mashing water. That technique temporarily raises the Calcium content to at least 40 ppm in the mash so that oxalate is precipitated. I use RO for sparging and that ends up diluting the overall calcium content back down into the 20 range. Lager yeast can be adversely affected by too much calcium. Low calcium is desirable for lager brewing.

Thanks Martin! I may just attempt the boiled Munich.