Author Topic: Rinsing Lager Yeast  (Read 612 times)

Offline gmac

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Rinsing Lager Yeast
« on: May 04, 2011, 08:30:46 AM »
I kegged a lager last night and I'm trying to rinse the yeast for re-use but I have a couple questions.  I've done this with ales before and there was always a distinct layering of the beer/yeast/trub in the jar.  But, in this case I've shaken it up and rinsed it 3 times already, leaving it sit for various lengths of time (from 10 min to overnight) and I don't see any "yeast" layer.  I get liquid and a very thick slurry of slightly greenish sediment.
There wasn't very much hop material added to the fermenter in the first place so it is possible that this could be mostly yeast but I'm just not sure.  There are about 2 inches of it in a 1.5 quart mason jar.  The original yeast was Wyeast Bohemian Pilsner, sorry forgot the #.

So, does lager yeast appear like ale yeast when rinsing?

Any problem with using the whole slurry (which may include trub) in another brew?  My intent was to save this to brew next week without a starter.

Thanks.

Online denny

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Re: Rinsing Lager Yeast
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2011, 08:32:11 AM »
It may have something to do with how flocculant the yeast is.  I'm trying some yeast rinsing at the moment and I'm finding that it takes 2-3 days at each step for the yeast to settle out.
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Offline SpanishCastleAle

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Re: Rinsing Lager Yeast
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2011, 09:21:51 AM »
I've used that yeast many times and it just doesn't wash easily.  With most ale yeasts I've used, the trub settles faster than the yeast so you get a distinct layer and can usually let most of the trub to settle then pour off the yeast-laden liquid.  With Wyeast 2124 I often just end up getting some trub but I think this can poorly affect head retention (lipids maybe?).  Wyeast 1968 (the uber-flocculant London ESB ale yeast) is so flocculant it actually forms a distinct layer UNDER the trub.

Offline gmac

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Re: Rinsing Lager Yeast
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2011, 09:42:13 AM »
Now I'm starting to worry that I've poured off most of the yeast and just kept the trub.  I may take an oz of the slurry and make a starter with it and see what I end up with instead of pitching the slurry.  Or, order new yeast...

Any experience with WLP833?  I'm going to be using it soon and will want to rinse it when the time comes.

Offline dbarber

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Re: Rinsing Lager Yeast
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2011, 09:43:30 AM »
I've also had no problems rinsing ale yeast, but never see a distinct layer when rinsing lager yeast.  I've never waited as long as Denny is, so I am interested to see how well it works.
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Offline wingnut

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Re: Rinsing Lager Yeast
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2011, 05:07:28 PM »
Any experience with WLP833?  I'm going to be using it soon and will want to rinse it when the time comes.

I have tried rinsing this yeast many times, and I do not get a distinct layer.  There is some trub that settles very fast, but most of the trub just settles with the yeast. 

What I wind up doing is doing a rinse and just decanting of the sediment that settles in the first 30 seconds or so.  Then I let the rest of the stuff still suspended in the decanted liquid to settle and use that for the next beer.

While it would be nice to pitch "pure" yeast into the next beer, I do not think it is detrimental to the beer if there is some carry over.  As long as the major hop particles and big clumps of break material are removed... I think you will be all set.
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