Author Topic: Rotisserie?  (Read 2697 times)

Offline blatz

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Re: Rotisserie?
« Reply #30 on: May 09, 2011, 09:12:05 AM »
damn - forgot the pictures - sorry.  It was a bit difficult to judge the internal temp since the meat near the bone was obviously very hot and then you had to make sure to not hit the spit with the thermapen - just did my best.

It was a little hectic while cooking - we were trying to cram in some pool time while cooking the roast and I was a little off since I expected a full 2 hours for the roast so I blanked on grabbing the camera or even my phone  :(

for the swiss chard, my wife generally makes it so I'll confirm this was the way and post back if I was mistaken, but here's the general rundown:

remove the leaves from the hard stems, wash, rough chop.  dice a small onion (vidalia perfect here) and saute with a few minced cloves garlic in OO in skillet till onions are soft, then add chard, and wilt like you would spinach.  add a splash of balsamic just before you take off the burner.  S&P to taste.
The happiest people don’t necessarily have the best of everything; they just make the best of everything they have.

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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Rotisserie?
« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2011, 09:21:08 AM »
remove the leaves from the hard stems, wash, rough chop.  dice a small onion (vidalia perfect here) and saute with a few minced cloves garlic in OO in skillet till onions are soft, then add chard, and wilt like you would spinach.  add a splash of balsamic just before you take off the burner.  S&P to taste.

Thanks.  I'll try that next time.  I normally do something similar, except I use bacon.  Cut bacon into lardons, crisp in pan, remove. Use bacon grease to wilt the greens, season, then toss in crisp bacon at end.  Works for just about any green, but the cook time will vary by the type of greens.

I had a dish at a Tapas restaurant in Oakland that was shredded chard (almost a chiffonade) cooked in butter with raisins and pine nuts.  Not sure of any other seasoning; that was based on what I could see and taste.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline euge

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Re: Rotisserie?
« Reply #32 on: May 09, 2011, 09:54:50 AM »
Now I'm hungry...

Sounds like it worked out well. ;D
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline SpanishCastleAle

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Re: Rotisserie?
« Reply #33 on: May 18, 2011, 11:42:37 AM »
blatz and Gordon's post got me wanting to TRY Swiss Chard for the first time.

First I cooked two slices of bacon lardons in a SS skillet until crispy, then removed the bacon but kept most of the grease.
Then a bit of chopped onion until translucent, then some smashed roasted garlic until aromatic.
Then the greens until wilted, a little kosher and black pepper at this stage too.
Added some roasted pine nuts halfway through.
Splash of red wine vinegar towards the end.
Into a bowl and topped with the crispy lardons.

nom.
effing.
nom.

Thanks for the ideas...I'll be making this again...and again...and again...

Offline euge

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Re: Rotisserie?
« Reply #34 on: May 18, 2011, 12:36:00 PM »
blatz and Gordon's post got me wanting to TRY Swiss Chard for the first time.

First I cooked two slices of bacon lardons in a SS skillet until crispy, then removed the bacon but kept most of the grease.
Then a bit of chopped onion until translucent, then some smashed roasted garlic until aromatic.
Then the greens until wilted, a little kosher and black pepper at this stage too.
Added some roasted pine nuts halfway through.
Splash of red wine vinegar towards the end.
Into a bowl and topped with the crispy lardons.

nom.
effing.
nom.

Thanks for the ideas...I'll be making this again...and again...and again...


That's good with almost any green. Try it with fresh spinach.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Rotisserie?
« Reply #35 on: May 18, 2011, 01:17:24 PM »
Great recipe and show. Steve is a BBQ genius.  :)

Raichlen's shows are great, a bit repetitive if you've seen as many as I have (BBQ U went for what, four seasons?) but I credit the man for making me a halfway decent outdoor cook.  He's simple, not flashy, a great writer, and a great teacher.  I have a number of his books, which for me are/were very valuable.  The reissued BBQ Bible is a good resource particularly for those that like world cuisine...only a small percentage of it focuses on American BBQ.  Primal Grill is a good show but I actually prefer the slightly less "flashy" format of BBQ University...less dramatic cutaways, pounding music, and such like, it feels more like a guy giving you a cooking lesson.

That said, I have great fun reading double entendre into everything he says on his shows.  I can't think of many examples, but some of the things he says are basically handcrafted for "TWSS!"  Not least of which is his motto about keeping it hot, clean, and lubricated.