Author Topic: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump  (Read 1106 times)

Offline enso

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 449
  • Northeast Kingdom, VT
    • View Profile
    • Bristle Bros. Brewing Blog
So I am really ready, I think to get a march pump.  I have figured all the ways I could utilize it and it seems a good idea.  I have read as many posts around the many forums and looked at other folks set-ups for ideas.  I get the basic ideas.  All the set-ups I have seen pictures of though seem to utilize a LOT of extra hardware in the way of valves, qd's and ss fittings.  It would seem you have to spend as much in hardware as you pay for the pump itself!

Anyone have a very simple yet effective set-up?  Maybe one ball valve on the outlet and a couple of fittings with hoses?  Or do you need $50-100 of extra hardware to make the pump worthwhile in effectiveness?
Dave Brush

Offline Pinski

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1564
  • Portland, Oregon
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2011, 06:49:10 PM »
For starters I set mine up with a male qd on the in port and put a ss ball valve immediately off of the out port followed by another male qd. My qd fittings are all plastic. It worked great and I was glad to have made the investment. 
Last week at a Big Brew event I saw a setup that I'm trying to duplicate.  This guy had modified a step stool by attaching a grill along one side to which he mounted the pump and waterproof switch/plug box. On the step he placed therminator with a thermometer incorporated. Both devices have simple and effective manifolds with shut off valves to regulate flow.  I realy liked how the pump was mounted with the ports at the low point so that any drippage that occured when disconnecting qd would simply hit the floor and not get into the pump or any other gear for that matter.  I bought most of the material yesterday hopefully have it built up in a couple weeks. I'll post pics.
Thank you BEER!

Offline weazletoe

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2132
  • Poca-hell-hole, Idaho
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2011, 09:02:40 PM »
Pinski, yes, please post some pics. When I build my new brewery, I'm definatly incorporating a pump, and have some many ideas racing in my head about plumbing, that it is hard to sleep at night. I would love a nice, simple, proven winner to look at. This sounds like it just might be it. Thanks!
A man works hard all week, so he doesn't have to wear pants all weekend.

Offline enso

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 449
  • Northeast Kingdom, VT
    • View Profile
    • Bristle Bros. Brewing Blog
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2011, 05:06:23 AM »
So for the QD's did you use the polysulfone ones?  If so that would be a 1/2" male disconnect to 1/2" npt for the outlet side and a male disconnect to female 1/2" npt for the inlet?  Then with the females they are hose barbs on the other side?  Plus I will assume say 10' at least of maybe the thermoplastic hose?

So it looks like (looking at northern brewer prices) for your setup I would be looking at ~$85 worth of parts in addition to the pump?  Sound about right?

Your setup sounds simple enough.  I guess maybe I am not quite ready (economically) to get the pump yet.  I had talked myself into ~$140 (the unwired version from NB)being a doable investment.  $250 (figuring in a switch,housing and wiring) isn't really in the budget.  I guess I was not really thinking about the total picture.   :(

Bummer.  Should have worked out all the details BEFORE I thought about the possibilities.
Dave Brush

Offline glastctbrew

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2011, 06:11:12 AM »
Hi,

I use SS cam lock disconnects in my setup  http://www.bargainfittings.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=140. I use females on the hoses and males on the pump, kettles and whirlpool inlet.  I don't use the barbed versions, 1/2" silicone and high temp hosing will fit over the threads and you're not restricting the flow by reducing the diameter via the barb.

If you go this route and you're using the high temp hosing, you'll find it easier to get the hose on the disconnect if you grind down the threads.  Also note that it is quite a bit easier to get the silicone hose on the disconnect but it is more susceptible to kinking.

 
« Last Edit: May 16, 2011, 06:16:04 AM by glastctbrew »
Scott
Still Hill Brewery

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11665
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2011, 08:31:06 AM »
I think I have about the cheapest pump setup.  I don't use QDs at all.  Just hose clamps that I loosen and retighten as I move hoses around.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8678
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2011, 09:38:07 AM »
I have a ball valve on the outlet side of the pump and two SS QD's but you could opt for brass which would be much cheaper. I think morebeer.com has a pretty good selection of brass QD's.

...or at the very least you can use Denny's method.
Ron Price

Offline Pinski

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1564
  • Portland, Oregon
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2011, 10:09:48 AM »
So for the QD's did you use the polysulfone ones?  If so that would be a 1/2" male disconnect to 1/2" npt for the outlet side and a male disconnect to female 1/2" npt for the inlet?  Then with the females they are hose barbs on the other side?  Plus I will assume say 10' at least of maybe the thermoplastic hose?
So it looks like (looking at northern brewer prices) for your setup I would be looking at ~$85 worth of parts in addition to the pump?  Sound about right?
Your setup sounds simple enough.  I guess maybe I am not quite ready (economically) to get the pump yet.  I had talked myself into ~$140 (the unwired version from NB)being a doable investment.  $250 (figuring in a switch,housing and wiring) isn't really in the budget.  I guess I was not really thinking about the total picture.   :(
Bummer.  Should have worked out all the details BEFORE I thought about the possibilities.

Yes, I used the polysulphone. As others recommeded I put the male QD posts on the stationary pieces and put the female QD fittings on the hoses. I use the 1/2" silicone tubing. I made three 6' hoses, two with two female QD and one with one female QD and a shorty for vorlaufing. Your estimation looks pretty close. I would just start simple if i were you. Like Denny pointed out you can do this effectively with just barbs,tubing and finger squeeze clamps.  Then upgrade as is feasible and when you know what will work best for you. You'll love the pump. Have fun!






Thank you BEER!

Offline Will's Swill

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Secretly likes wine...
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2011, 05:15:01 PM »
I have a ball valve with hose barb on the output side, and a hose barb on the input side.  I just push my silicone hoses on, no clamps anywhere.  However, I am thinking about going the full manifold route with QDs and all just for ease of use.
Is that a counter-pressure bottle filler in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

Offline enso

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 449
  • Northeast Kingdom, VT
    • View Profile
    • Bristle Bros. Brewing Blog
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2011, 09:28:09 AM »
For those folks with a simple setup.  Why is it that I always see a ss couple and then a hose barb in the inlet.  Is there not a hose barb that can attache directly to the pump?
Dave Brush

Offline JKL

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 180
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2011, 10:26:31 AM »
For those folks with a simple setup.  Why is it that I always see a ss couple and then a hose barb in the inlet.  Is there not a hose barb that can attache directly to the pump?

If you want S/S, you could get one of these or just get a brass one @ the Depot and pickle it.

http://www.bargainfittings.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=36_39&product_id=125

-J.K.L.
"Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire." -David Rains Wallace

John K. Lee
AHA Member
Rock City, AR

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11665
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Looking for the simplest, most economical set-up for a pump
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2011, 10:31:46 AM »
For those folks with a simple setup.  Why is it that I always see a ss couple and then a hose barb in the inlet.  Is there not a hose barb that can attache directly to the pump?

The pump has a male fitting on the output.  I've never seen a female to hose barb fitting, so I use a coupler like you say.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe