Author Topic: Wyeast 1450  (Read 14169 times)

Online Kaiser

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #75 on: February 06, 2010, 08:36:31 AM »
What's the ideal and desired attenuation with this yeast?

If we talk about attenuation of a yeast, we should always talk about how close the yeast comes to the attenuation limit (wort fermentability) given typical fermentation conditions.

Kai

Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #76 on: February 06, 2010, 09:24:27 AM »
What's the ideal and desired attenuation with this yeast?

If we talk about attenuation of a yeast, we should always talk about how close the yeast comes to the attenuation limit (wort fermentability) given typical fermentation conditions.

Kai

True. I guess I should be more specific with recipe details.

Typically speaking...an IPA mashed at 150F with 95% 2-row and 5% medium crystal.

Pitched at 64F and fermented at 68F.

What is the ideal attenuation?
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 09:27:43 AM by bluesman »
Ron Price

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #77 on: February 06, 2010, 09:37:45 AM »
Ideal?  Who knows.  Expected would be in the 75-80% area.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #78 on: February 06, 2010, 11:38:33 AM »
Ideal?  Who knows.  Expected would be in the 75-80% area.

The reason I ask is because you mentioned in an earlier post about how 1450 has a fuller, silkier mouthfeel as compared to WLP001.

...but yet given the level of attenuation on your latest beer (finishing at 1.010), wouldn't that be considered on the dry side?
Ron Price

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #79 on: February 06, 2010, 11:42:18 AM »
Ideal?  Who knows.  Expected would be in the 75-80% area.

The reason I ask is because you mentioned in an earlier post about how 1450 has a fuller, silkier mouthfeel as compared to WLP001.

...but yet given the level of attenuation on your latest beer (finishing at 1.010), wouldn't that be considered on the dry side?

IME, mouthfeel doesn't necessarily relate to FG.  For instance, fermenting 05, 1056 and 1450 to the same FG will yield differences in the mouthfeel and dryness of the beer.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Online Kaiser

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #80 on: February 06, 2010, 12:34:52 PM »
I had beers that finished at 1.006 without being thin. The OG was about 1.048. But it was a different yeast. 

Kai

Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #81 on: February 06, 2010, 12:36:26 PM »
I had beers that finished at 1.006 without being thin. The OG was about 1.048. But it was a different yeast. 

Kai

What was the recipe?
Ron Price

Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #82 on: February 06, 2010, 01:24:27 PM »
Specific gravity is the heaviness of a substance compared to that of water. Water being at 1.000. Anything higher than that (water) will have a higher viscocity.

If one beer finishes at 1.023 and another finishes at 1.010, the beer that finished at 1.023 will have a higher viscocity and therefore fuller mouthfeel.

When I make an IPA that finishes at 1.016 vs another that finishes at 1.010, the higher finishing gravity will lend more mouthfeel than the lower gravity.

This is what I have always known to be true.

Here's some data to show what I have just explained.

http://www.csgnetwork.com/sgvisc.html

Ron Price

Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #83 on: February 06, 2010, 02:11:41 PM »
A University of California study entitled "Instrumental Evaluation of the mouthfeel of Beer and Coorelation of Sensory Evaluation" identified the following compounds believed to be related to the mouthfeel of beer.

protein, glycerol, B-glucan, polyphenols, viscosity, dextrins, chloride, alcohol and carbon dioxide

 Kai - I think you'll enjoy this!

http://appliedsensory.com/Documents/Inst%20Eval%20of%20the%20MF%20of%20Beer.pdf

Ron Price

Online Kaiser

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #84 on: February 06, 2010, 03:01:42 PM »
What was the recipe?

It was a Weissbier and I tested a number of yeasts. The odd one is a yeast that must have started as WLP351. I have it in my bank as 351-1. It results in very poor head retention, clove dominated aroma/taste and a final gravity close to 1.5 Plato when other yeasts make it to 2.7 Plato with the same wort. Here is a blog entry that documents that: http://braukaiser.com/lifetype2/index.php?op=ViewArticle&articleId=103&blogId=1

I also made a full batch with it but the poor head retention is a turn-off since the beer was pretty good otherwise.

Kai

Online Kaiser

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #85 on: February 06, 2010, 03:08:22 PM »
Specific gravity is the heaviness of a substance compared to that of water. Water being at 1.000. Anything higher than that (water) will have a higher viscocity.

In my experience I had watery beers that had a higher gravity than beers with lower gravity which had a fuller mouthfeel. I remember tasting a Doppelbock of mine against Spaten's Doppelbock and while mine had a less thick mouthfeel than the Spaten Doppelbock it also had a higher gravity. Ever since that experience and also after talking to other brewers there is much more to mouthfeel than attenuation. In particular the yeast and fermentation can play a big role.

Kai

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #86 on: February 06, 2010, 04:32:16 PM »
Specific gravity is the heaviness of a substance compared to that of water. Water being at 1.000. Anything higher than that (water) will have a higher viscocity.

In my experience I had watery beers that had a higher gravity than beers with lower gravity which had a fuller mouthfeel. I remember tasting a Doppelbock of mine against Spaten's Doppelbock and while mine had a less thick mouthfeel than the Spaten Doppelbock it also had a higher gravity. Ever since that experience and also after talking to other brewers there is much more to mouthfeel than attenuation. In particular the yeast and fermentation can play a big role.

Kai


I don't necessarily disagree with that. But...

In my experience higher finishing gravity beers typically have more mouthfeel and visa-versa.
Ron Price

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #87 on: February 06, 2010, 05:12:01 PM »
I don't necessarily disagree with that. But...

In my experience higher finishing gravity beers typically have more mouthfeel and visa-versa.

I don't think either Kai or I would disagree with that.  But my experience is that there's something more than just that.  2 beers can finish at the same FG but have different mouthfeel.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #88 on: February 06, 2010, 05:26:28 PM »
Agreed.

I'd like to know what the mechanism is that can make that happen.


Ron Price

Offline el_capitan

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #89 on: February 06, 2010, 07:59:38 PM »
Agreed.

I'd like to know what the mechanism is that can make that happen.




I'm thinking it's "yeast-schmoo" or something along those lines.  Eh? 
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