Author Topic: Wyeast 1450  (Read 18316 times)

Offline dean

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #90 on: February 07, 2010, 05:54:13 AM »
Agreed.

I'd like to know what the mechanism is that can make that happen.




I'm thinking it's "yeast-schmoo" or something along those lines.  Eh? 

 ;D  Now that was Funny!!   :D ;D

Offline Kaiser

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #91 on: February 07, 2010, 09:40:54 AM »
In my experience higher finishing gravity beers typically have more mouthfeel and visa-versa.

True, this may be the case for most beers but here are some non yeast related mechanisms through which a lower gravity beer can have a fuller mouthfeel and viscosity than a higher gravity beer:

- beta glucans. Even in small amounts they tend to increase the viscosity significantly
- proteins: the same with beta glucans. It doesn't take much of them to increase the viscosity.

I have yet to read that paper, though. The title sound interesting. Thanks.

Kai

Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #92 on: February 07, 2010, 10:59:13 AM »
That has been shown to be the case in the study I posted. I wonder how different yeasts can affect the final viscosity of beer. Perhaps that is a whole new topic.  8)
Ron Price

Offline dean

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #93 on: February 12, 2010, 08:30:22 AM »
I used this yeast after stepping it up two times then split the yeast into two carboys, both having the same wort, same quantities.  The yeast was very fresh and at first I wasn't sure what I was seeing after only an hour and a half or two in both fermenters, foam from aerating or yeast at work because I still had a nice layer at the top.  I did see slight activity in one airlock, nothing vigorous only a slight rise in the one.  Sometime in the night both took off nicely though and I could see with no doubt the yeast was working because it was definitely krauzen and both airlocks were plunking away.  I had pitched the yeast at about 60 degrees.

The funny part is this, today only one was working (judging by airlock activity anyway).  I've since moved that one near a heat supply vent and its working again.  The other one which is the carboy that actually received the least amount of yeast, because I couldn't judge accurately the amount I poured in the first carboy, has never stopped showing airlock activity.  Here is what I think happened.  Although I left some liquid after decanting and swirled, a greater quantity settled to the bottom possibly so the second carboy may have received more yeast cells than the first carboy?  It really doesn't matter I suppose but it has me curious.

So far I like this yeast.  I love the smell, its definitely got a soft yeasty aroma which I hope will be there in the taste as well.  Another thing I can see that I will like is this yeast does seem to like it just a little bit warmer, I've got it in the computer room which is roughly 64 to 65 degrees so it might be a good yeast during the warmer months.  Just tuck your fermenter away in a somewhat cool spot during summer and I bet this yeast willl perform well and hopefully not create fusels like other yeast might.

Just thought I'd post my opinion on it so far.   :)


Offline dean

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #94 on: February 22, 2010, 10:57:14 AM »
Just an update on this yeast from my first time using it.  Clean tasting and nice attenuation, thats about it... maybe a little tartness to it but I don't know yet because I did two different carboys and one is still in the carboy conditioning whereas one I kegged still cloudy (yeh its really slow flocculating) and its been conditioning outside a few days now ranging from ~30* to 40* depending on weather, day and night etc.  Tastewise... its good, even if I kegged it a bit soon.   ;D  Got a rye brew on the slurry from it now.   8)

Offline bspisak

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #95 on: February 23, 2010, 09:42:59 AM »

Just did a 5 gallon split batch (2.5 each) with this yeast and WLP001. The 1450 was right from the smack pack after about 6 hours and the WLP001 from a starter that had krausened but not been chilled. The 1450 took off much faster. Perhaps that is a thumbs up to the Wyeast smack packs.

Question: I keep hearing 1450 has a full mouthfeel. What exactly is it about this yeast that gives that impression?  I always associated mouthfeel with other parameters of the recipe/process but never the yeast.

Brian

Offline bspisak

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #96 on: February 23, 2010, 02:34:21 PM »

Oh, I just read back in the thread and found my answer (to why 1450 has a better mouthfeel): "yeast-schmoo."  LoL.

I too would be interested in a quantitative answer. I'll be able to qualitatively answer this when my split batch is done. ;-)

Brian

Offline bspisak

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #97 on: February 23, 2010, 03:18:18 PM »
A University of California study ... identified the following compounds believed to be related to the mouthfeel of beer.

protein, glycerol, B-glucan, polyphenols, viscosity, dextrins, chloride, alcohol and carbon dioxide

http://appliedsensory.com/Documents/Inst%20Eval%20of%20the%20MF%20of%20Beer.pdf

Excellent read. That pretty much addresses what components create a perception of mouthfeel. One can infer that several of these are yeast related.  I wonder which one(s) 1450 is contributing?

Brian

Offline bluesman

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #98 on: February 23, 2010, 05:55:59 PM »
A University of California study ... identified the following compounds believed to be related to the mouthfeel of beer.

protein, glycerol, B-glucan, polyphenols, viscosity, dextrins, chloride, alcohol and carbon dioxide

http://appliedsensory.com/Documents/Inst%20Eval%20of%20the%20MF%20of%20Beer.pdf

Excellent read. That pretty much addresses what components create a perception of mouthfeel. One can infer that several of these are yeast related.  I wonder which one(s) 1450 is contributing?

Brian

That my friend is a good question. Maybe "Yeast Schmoo"  :-\
Ron Price

Offline dean

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #99 on: February 24, 2010, 04:59:48 AM »
I think Yeast Schmoo should be entered into the homebrewers lexicon.   ;D :D

Offline skyler

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #100 on: February 24, 2010, 05:27:57 PM »
Ok, I'm ready to try again. 2 of my next 4 beers are going to be 1450'd - another Red Seal-inspired beer (calling it "Clubbed Seal Ale"), and some form of IPA - maybe a toned-down Pliny clone.

Offline dean

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #101 on: February 25, 2010, 06:18:50 AM »
I'm thinking of calling mine Rye'der on the Storm or Pale Rye'der.   ;D :D

Offline dean

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #102 on: February 26, 2010, 08:56:17 AM »
I like WY1450... it seems to give more real beer flavor imo... maltier flavor with somewhat of a silky mouthfeel.  I'm impressed with it so far.   ;D

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #103 on: March 08, 2010, 10:50:57 AM »
I just pitched a healthy slurry of wyeast 1450 into a 1.048 OG Pale Ale yesterday. I noticed in this thread some people mention the yeast performs a little sluggishly at/or around 60 degrees. I currently have this in the basement at 58 next to an IPA that was fermented at the same temp using US-05. I wanted to do an experiment and see if the 1450 would work well under those conditions. Does everyone think I should move this into the mid 60's (ambient) instead?
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1450
« Reply #104 on: March 08, 2010, 10:52:13 AM »
I'd say it depends on what you want...like you say, it may be sluggish at that temp.  If you're in a hurry, moving it to the mid 60s is fine.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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