Author Topic: Yet another Rookie question...Pitching  (Read 612 times)

Offline mswilliams1975

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Yet another Rookie question...Pitching
« on: May 19, 2011, 02:37:50 PM »
OK so I was reading the Joy of Homebrewing last night and they way I read about when to pitch the yeast made me question my comprehension.
Do I pitch the yeast while the wort is still in the brew pot after it has cooled or do I wait and pitch my yeast after adding the wort to the water in the carboy? For that matter is there a difference either way?
My thought is if I pitch before then I do not want to use my strainer on the funnel incase that catches any of the wonderful beer making yeast.

Thoughts and input are once again much appreciated.
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Re: Yet another Rookie question...Pitching
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2011, 02:43:30 PM »
Your strainer won't strain out the yeast, but what you want to do is pitch the yeast into the wort in the fermenter once it's cooled down to your intended fermentation temp.  In your case, that means after you add the cooled wort to the water in your fermenter.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Yet another Rookie question...Pitching
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2011, 02:49:11 PM »
definitely pitch the yeast in the fermenter once the wort is cooled under 70-72 degrees, and after a good period of aeration. Also, while I absolutely loved "The complete joy of homebrewing" (it was the book that really taught me to brew "back in the day") I'd recommend picking up John Palmer's "How to Brew" to get a more up-to-date book on brewing.
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Re: Yet another Rookie question...Pitching
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2011, 03:12:09 PM »
Also, while I absolutely loved "The complete joy of homebrewing" (it was the book that really taught me to brew "back in the day") I'd recommend picking up John Palmer's "How to Brew" to get a more up-to-date book on brewing.

Same here on both counts.  And buy the 3rd edition.  The online 1st ed. is handy, but John changed and updated a lot of info for the 3rd.  In addition, his writing style is a little looser and the 3rd. is more fun to read.
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Offline mswilliams1975

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Re: Yet another Rookie question...Pitching
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2011, 03:39:30 PM »
I bought the 3rd and will also pick up the other. I figure the more information the better.

Thanks for the input and feedback.
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Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Yet another Rookie question...Pitching
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2011, 04:51:10 PM »
definitely pitch the yeast in the fermenter once the wort is cooled under 70-72 degrees, and after a good period of aeration. Also, while I absolutely loved "The complete joy of homebrewing" (it was the book that really taught me to brew "back in the day") I'd recommend picking up John Palmer's "How to Brew" to get a more up-to-date book on brewing.

Papazian's books are really good for beginners and are fun to read, but they're a bit dated and have some errors. So I second the recommendation that you go with "How to Brew."

BTW, if you're using a bucket, sufficient aeration means stirring your wort vigorously for at least 10 minutes once it gets to pitching temperature. The idea is to get oxygen into the wort to encourage yeast growth before the yeast gets around to fermenting your beer.

If you're using a carboy, sit on the floor with the carboy between your legs, hold it by the shoulders (not the neck) and gently rock it back and forth so the the wort splashes around. Do this for at least 10 minutes. Sitting spares your back and gives you better control over the rocking motion. Alternately, you might be able to get the handle of a long spoon into the neck of carboy and stir with that, but rocking the carboy works better.