Author Topic: Rice hull question  (Read 8554 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #30 on: May 23, 2011, 04:30:54 PM »
If you need them, you're doing something wrong.

First of tell that to Gordon Strong!!  I don't think he's doing anything wrong.  His new book addresses the fact that he is a big proponent of rice hulls, even when not using sticky adjuncts.

That being said, my stouts always stick.  I started adding rice hulls after a terrible brew day, and have never looked back.  A lot of flaked barley and oatmeal sticks my system.  If you don't have to add them, good for you.  As a beginner like the OP is, I would highly suggest it for smooth lautering.  They definitely come in handy at my brew house!!

Gordon uses a pico-Brewing system, like me (made by a guy in our club back in the 90's to early oughts).  I use rice hulls for some rye beers, but the last time I made a Wry Smile Rye IPA, I malt conditioned and had no problems.  Before malt conditioning, it would stick.

I have had problems with Marris Otter sticking for one bag.  Others in the club had the same problem until that lot number was used up and we got new bags. 

A 5# bag of rice hulls is in the garage, just in case.
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Offline liquidbrewing

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #31 on: May 23, 2011, 05:27:19 PM »
Ok, gotcha.  The way he talked about it in the book, Brew Better Beer, it sounded like he still does this.
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ccarlson

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #32 on: May 23, 2011, 06:02:23 PM »
If you need them, you're doing something wrong.

First of tell that to Gordon Strong!!  I don't think he's doing anything wrong.  His new book addresses the fact that he is a big proponent of rice hulls, even when not using sticky adjuncts.

That being said, my stouts always stick.  I started adding rice hulls after a terrible brew day, and have never looked back.  A lot of flaked barley and oatmeal sticks my system.  If you don't have to add them, good for you.  As a beginner like the OP is, I would highly suggest it for smooth lautering.  They definitely come in handy at my brew house!!

Gordon uses a pico-Brewing system, like me (made by a guy in our club back in the 90's to early oughts).  I use rice hulls for some rye beers, but the last time I made a Wry Smile Rye IPA, I malt conditioned and had no problems.  Before malt conditioning, it would stick.

I have had problems with Marris Otter sticking for one bag.  Others in the club had the same problem until that lot number was used up and we got new bags. 

A 5# bag of rice hulls is in the garage, just in case.

Even though I don't need them, I guess I should start using rice hulls because Gordon does? :)

Does using rice hulls hurt your beer? Absolutely not, but beer can definitely made without them.  I honestly don't even know where to buy them, but I've also never looked for them.

Offline gymrat

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #33 on: May 23, 2011, 06:05:04 PM »
maybe I didn't add enough rice hulls. Or maybe my crush is too fine. Either way I am not going to do another wheat beer until I learn more about this stuff. I only did this one because I got a 50 lb bag of Rahr Malted Wheat for $10. It is going to stay in storage until I have more experience under my belt.

My mill is a Barley Crusher set to factory setting. It is supposed to be .039 at the mark. I need to do some all barley brews to figure out if I need to loosen it up some.

60% efficiency? I guess I do have a lot to learn :) But that's part of the fun of brewing, right?

All I know is after investing 7 hours this stuff had better taste good.  ;D
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Offline euge

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #34 on: May 23, 2011, 06:09:07 PM »
After having to empty the contents of my  mash tun and clean it out not once, not twice, not even three times, but four times, I have decided I won't do another wheat beer until I have a better handle on what I am doing.

I'm understanding you got a stuck mash even with 1/4 pound of rice hulls?

Gymrat most likely you've tried to lauter your mash too quickly.  And that can be problematic with a false bottom. Running off the wort too quickly will compact the grain bed and will result tin a stuck mash. Try throttleing back on the runoff and see if that helps.
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Offline gymrat

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #35 on: May 23, 2011, 06:15:12 PM »
Thankyou for your response and advice. I thought I was draining it slowly. But maybe it wasn't slow enough.
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Offline liquidbrewing

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #36 on: May 23, 2011, 06:27:35 PM »


Even though I don't need them, I guess I should start using rice hulls because Gordon does? :)


[/quote]

That's not what I was implying.  I was simply trying to respond to your first post.  They work for me, when I need them.  Wasn't trying to start a pissin' contest! ;D
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #37 on: May 23, 2011, 06:49:43 PM »
Ok, gotcha.  The way he talked about it in the book, Brew Better Beer, it sounded like he still does this.

Maybe he will say on this thread if he still does.

It is probably system dependent.  If you batch sparge with a Denny braid - no problem acording to Denny.  If you have a false bottom, have some on hand just in case, so you can say "rice hulls to the rescue" like I do.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2011, 06:51:41 PM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #38 on: May 23, 2011, 09:29:01 PM »
I just did a 60+% malted wheat beer in a keggle with a false bottom, no rice hulls, no sticking.  I keep a couple of pounds of hulls around though, just in case.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2011, 12:35:30 AM »
Thankyou for your response and advice. I thought I was draining it slowly. But maybe it wasn't slow enough.

Generally, slower run-off means better efficiency and less risk of stuck mash since the grain bed "floats" above your false bottom or manifold. For a 5-gallon batch, consider slowing your run-off rate so that it takes 45-60 minutes to collect your wort.

Offline tygo

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Re: Rice hull question
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2011, 03:52:56 AM »
Ok, gotcha.  The way he talked about it in the book, Brew Better Beer, it sounded like he still does this.

Maybe he will say on this thread if he still does.

It's on p. 32, bottom of the second paragraph.  He says he likes them to help even out the mash temperature across the mash as well as a lautering aid.  I imagine he'll chime in at some point.   :)

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