Poll

All Grain Efficancy

n
6 (37.5%)
m
5 (31.3%)
l
5 (31.3%)

Total Members Voted: 15

Author Topic: All Grain Efficancy  (Read 3036 times)

Online dmtaylor

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Re: All Grain Efficancy
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2011, 04:42:32 AM »
Measure your efficency before the boil. It has nothing to do with after the boil.
I know what you're trying to say tubercle, but this is misleading.  You can measure your efficiency in the kettle before or after the boil, it doesn't matter.  The efficiency will not change.  You can measure it in the fermenter and it will be lower than in the kettle because of losses, but that's just a different kind of efficiency.

Efficiency is just the sugar content of the volume.  If you collect more and boil it down you will have a higher gravity, thus a higher efficiency.  But the boil didn't (and can't) change the efficiency.

+1.  It's a matter of science.
Dave

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Offline weithman5

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Re: All Grain Efficancy
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2011, 06:04:45 AM »
i just voted n to put it in the lead.  they were all tied, couldn't have that ;D

i tend to measure efficiency using what goes in to the fermenter as my final volume.  that way i have an overall measure of cost in my grain to finished product.  not that i actually have ever figured what it costs me to brew, just seems like what i should eval as process control.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: All Grain Efficancy
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2011, 06:44:38 AM »
Measure your efficency before the boil. It has nothing to do with after the boil.
I know what you're trying to say tubercle, but this is misleading.  You can measure your efficiency in the kettle before or after the boil, it doesn't matter.  The efficiency will not change.  You can measure it in the fermenter and it will be lower than in the kettle because of losses, but that's just a different kind of efficiency.

Efficiency is just the sugar content of the volume.  If you collect more and boil it down you will have a higher gravity, thus a higher efficiency.  But the boil didn't (and can't) change the efficiency.

Agreed.

Sugar doesn't evaporate in the kettle during the boil. The amount of sugar in solution lautered into the boil kettle will be the same amount in the kettle at the end of the boil thus not altering the brewhouse efficiency, eventhough the gravity steadily increases during the boil.
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Offline euge

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Re: All Grain Efficancy
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2011, 04:32:12 PM »
I always measure after it's reached pitching temps and is in the fermenters. I have a better idea of the actual volume. Seems accurate enough to me. I do it this way because measuring wort before the boil can be problematic due to the temps and wort expansion. I've had more errors pre boil as opposed to post.
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Offline hokerer

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Re: All Grain Efficancy
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2011, 04:41:19 PM »
I always measure after it's reached pitching temps and is in the fermenters. I have a better idea of the actual volume. Seems accurate enough to me. I do it this way because measuring wort before the boil can be problematic due to the temps and wort expansion. I've had more errors pre boil as opposed to post.

Same here.  I do all my volume measurements at room temp.  Just feels more like comparing apples to apples.
Joe