Author Topic: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?  (Read 1080 times)

Offline majorvices

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Re: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2011, 08:19:33 PM »
I have used WB-06 a few time but am not fond of the strain. It is more tart to me than anything and very one dimensional. I also enjoy my hefeweizens to be very "clovy" so I normally employ a ferulic acid rest at around 111.

I have brewed a lot of kolsches and I brew alt very regularly (probably once every 2 or 3 weeks) and if you ferment these strains too warm or don't pitch enough yeast you can get some over the top esters. I try an keep my alt and kolsch down in the very low 60's, usually pitching around 58 and they come out pretty clean.
Keith Y.
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Offline nateo

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Re: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2011, 08:35:47 PM »
Major - what are your preferences for alt and kolsch strains?
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Offline majorvices

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Re: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2011, 05:54:33 AM »
For kolsch wlp029 works well and clears very fast. Wy2565 takes longer to clear but has a more complex ester profile.

For al wy1007 is hands down the best followed by wlp001, wlp029 makes a decent alt as well.
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Offline Malticulous

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Re: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2011, 06:56:45 PM »
I seldom get as many esters on the second pitch of a weizen yeast. Maybe I pitch too much? I have a hefe wiess ready to bottle with WLP300 now. I'm thinking of a roggen next.

Offline nateo

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Re: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2011, 06:05:40 PM »
I seldom get as many esters on the second pitch of a weizen yeast. Maybe I pitch too much? I have a hefe wiess ready to bottle with WLP300 now. I'm thinking of a roggen next.

I've heard a lot of people say that. I've seldom save and repitch yeast because I like trying out new ones, but I've also had easy access to a couple different LHBSs so getting yeast wasn't an issue.

I've been reading up on the ProBrewer forums, and a lot of guys over there are pitching about 60% the amount of yeast they normally would when repitching, in order to keep the esters high.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: How versatile are German wheat yeasts?
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2011, 06:13:55 PM »
For kolsch wlp029 works well and clears very fast. Wy2565 takes longer to clear but has a more complex ester profile.For al wy1007 is hands down the best followed by wlp001, wlp029 makes a decent alt as well.

This has been my experience as well. You really can't go wrong with either of these two if you pitch low and ferment around 60F.
Ron Price