Author Topic: Blichmann Beer Gun  (Read 5918 times)

Offline jared long

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Blichmann Beer Gun
« on: May 24, 2011, 04:38:30 PM »
greetings!

i just got done with an extremely frustrating session with my newly purchased blichmann beer gun.  somehow, i'm getting air bubbles in the line right at where the beverage ball lock attaches to my keg.  i'm certain that all my connections are tight (hose clamps, etc.), i let all the pressure off the keg and am pushing the beer into the bottles with minimal pressure (~3 psi). 

for the life of me, i can't find out where the air is coming from.  any tips/ideas would be immensely appreciated.

thanks much!

Offline bonjour

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2011, 04:45:41 PM »
you are under pressure (3psi), you CANNOT be getting air in.
Likely you are seeing CO2 degassing.
Fred Bonjour
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Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

ccarlson

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2011, 04:48:52 PM »
you are under pressure (3psi), you CANNOT be getting air in.
Likely you are seeing CO2 degassing.

That or your lines are very warm, but that should stop pretty quickly when they cool down. Are you using the recommended 10', small diameter line?

Offline bluesman

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2011, 04:51:32 PM »
I agree. You are seeing CO2 outgassing from the keg/beer. This is normal and can be expected when operating the beer valve.
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Offline jared long

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2011, 04:53:28 PM »
ya, i'm using the smaller diameter, 10' line that the gun came with. 

is it possible that my source kegged beer is overly carbonated?  i'm having trouble filling bottles without getting a ridiculous amount of foam.

Offline bluesman

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2011, 04:55:55 PM »
ya, i'm using the smaller diameter, 10' line that the gun came with. 

is it possible that my source kegged beer is overly carbonated?  i'm having trouble filling bottles without getting a ridiculous amount of foam.

Very Possible. Try tasting the beer. If it's overcarbonated, warm up the keg while releasing the pressure every half hour until it reaches a desired carbonation level.
Ron Price

Offline beer_crafter

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2011, 07:00:11 PM »
What temp is your beer and what PSI was it carbonated at?  I find the beer gun works best when I have conditioned the beer on the cold side and the PSI a little lower than I normally like to serve at.

Offline tygo

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2011, 07:07:26 PM »
Did you chill down the bottles to at least the temperature of the beer before filling?
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Offline jared long

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2011, 07:20:33 PM »
i did pre-chill the bottles.  also, i'm not sure that would explain why air is being introduced at the keg.

from consulting a carbonation chart, my guess is that i'm carbonating my beers to an excessive level, which brings up another question: how do you achieve your (proper) desired carbonation level quickly?  my sense is that the crank-and-shake method would result in an excessive (and unpredictable) amount of carbonation.

Online dbeechum

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2011, 07:27:04 PM »
Yeah it does.

I use to shake and bake my kegs into oblivion until I decided that was nonsense. Since I'm a busy guy and a hell of a procrastinator I need some way to get these done in a hurry.

So I set my regulator to the appropriate PSI for temp and desired carbonation (+1 psi), connect the gas and then rock it back and forth for ~10 minutes.

Works like a charm and not overcarbed.
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2011, 07:31:44 PM »
The Beer Gun works, IMHO, best when the beer is cold (the colder the better) and delivered at a pressure that is just enough to move the beer.  You got the right idea with 3psi.
The first bottle, maybe 2 foam while the lines and gun are cooling, but after that no problem.  I also do not chill my bottles, but that would not hurt.
Fred Bonjour
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Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline beer_crafter

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2011, 01:23:30 PM »
As bonjour said, air is not being introduced, CO2 is coming out of solution.

Offline johnf

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2011, 02:44:51 PM »
As bonjour said, air is not being introduced, CO2 is coming out of solution.

And you prevent this two ways:

1. Keep as much of the line cold (in the fridge) as possible.
2. Go fast, this involves a second person to do everything other than filling so you are basically filling constantly.

Offline bluesman

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2011, 05:00:36 PM »
As bonjour said, air is not being introduced, CO2 is coming out of solution.

And you prevent this two ways:

1. Keep as much of the line cold (in the fridge) as possible.
2. Go fast, this involves a second person to do everything other than filling so you are basically filling constantly.

This is sound advice.  I've also found that by minimizing the time delay from bottle to bottle filling there will be less foaming. Also, the colder the beer the more soluble the CO2 will be in the beer which in turn will lead to less foaming.
Ron Price

Offline Will's Swill

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Re: Blichmann Beer Gun
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2011, 02:38:02 PM »
I would add that "Go fast" should not inlcude the actual fill of individual bottles.  Filling slowly will minimize CO2 outgassing.
Is that a counter-pressure bottle filler in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?