Author Topic: In-line Oxygenation  (Read 1868 times)

Offline Pinski

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1714
  • Portland, Oregon
    • View Profile
In-line Oxygenation
« on: May 24, 2011, 02:55:27 PM »
Can someone give me the rundown on how this works?  Is it just a matter of adding another 1/2" Tee after the wort comes out of the chiller en route to the fermenter, then mount an aeration stone externally.  Does the wort draw enough air through the stone to adequately oxygenate the wort for a vigorous fermentation?  Am I missing something?
Steve Carper
Green Dragon Brew Crew
Clubs: Oregon Brew Crew & Strange Brew
BJCP Certified

Offline Will's Swill

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Secretly likes wine...
    • View Profile
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2011, 04:56:42 PM »
Actually, you can just put a short length of tubing with small holes drilled in it in line with your chiller output on the way to the fermenter.  The flow of the wort will suck air in through the holes.  I have also just put a small groove in the end of the hose that I attach to my chiller output (with no hose clamp), and it sucks in a fair amount of air as well.
Is that a counter-pressure bottle filler in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

Offline tom

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1110
  • Denver, CO
    • View Profile
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2011, 06:56:59 PM »
I use a diffusion stone with pure oxygen.  1 minute for ales, 2 minutes for lagers.
Brew on

Offline mabrungard

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1398
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2011, 05:37:45 AM »
I use an in-line oxygenation system that is made with a 1/2 inch copper tee and a reducer that was further soldered closed so that I could drill it to fit the small oxygen tubing tightly without leaking.  There are reducers at each end of the wort flow path in the system to take the line diameter from 3/8 inch to 1/2 inch so that the sintered stone will fit within the system.   

I pump my wort through my Therminator plate chiller and then through the oxygenator on its way to my fermentor.  I use 25 ft of 3/8 inch tubing after the oxygenator to allow me to reach the fermentation chamber from my brewing location.  That 25 ft of tubing provides a long residence time for the oxygen contact, so I know my transfer coefficient is very high.  I literally trickle the oxygen through the sintered stone while the pump is flowing wide open.  I can see a definite stream of fine bubbles through the tubing.  I know my O2 flow rate is low since I can treat about 20 batches or more with a single red O2 tank.  I wish I had an O2 meter to check the effectiveness, but the only evidence I have is clean tasting beer and very active fermentation. 
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brun-Water/464551136933908

Offline tom

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1110
  • Denver, CO
    • View Profile
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 03:39:02 PM »
Martin, Do you get oxidation from doing that?  For a while I left the oxygen on for the full transfer time and got really bad oxidation.  Now I just leave it on for a minute or 2 (per 5 gallons) and it seems to ferment well.

I would like to do the 25' transfer hose too.  I brew out back and then have to carry the fermenter down my 100 year old stairs to the basement.  How do you take care of it?  Do you take it apart after each brew?  It sounds like it is on the cold side.  How do you sanitize it beforehand?

TIA, Tom
Brew on

Offline rabid_dingo

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 787
  • Brighton, CO :D
    • View Profile
    • Mile High Monks
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2011, 05:29:47 PM »
I have the holes in the hose. I created a spiral of holes along the hose into the fermenter.
The wort comes out as if it is coming out of an areated faucet.
Ruben * Colorado :)

Offline Pinski

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1714
  • Portland, Oregon
    • View Profile
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2011, 05:59:58 PM »
When you guys say "holes in the hose", are we talking needle pokes or something larger?
Steve Carper
Green Dragon Brew Crew
Clubs: Oregon Brew Crew & Strange Brew
BJCP Certified

Offline Thirsty_Monk

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2173
  • Eau Claire WI
    • View Profile
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2011, 07:21:32 PM »
You could use venturi tube.
Something like this:


Skip all the other fancy stuff.
You can find the venturi tube in aquarium stores.
Na Zdravie

On Tap At The TapRoom:
Bohemian Pilsner
Bohemian Dark Lager
Smoked Bock
MaiBock
American Brown Ale
Marzen
Root beer

Offline mabrungard

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1398
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2011, 04:59:26 AM »
Martin, Do you get oxidation from doing that?  For a while I left the oxygen on for the full transfer time and got really bad oxidation.  Now I just leave it on for a minute or 2 (per 5 gallons) and it seems to ferment well.

I would like to do the 25' transfer hose too.  I brew out back and then have to carry the fermenter down my 100 year old stairs to the basement.  How do you take care of it?  Do you take it apart after each brew?  It sounds like it is on the cold side.  How do you sanitize it beforehand?

TIA, Tom

I use a very low flow rate and do not pick up any oxidation notes in my finished beers.  As I said, my oxygen usage is very low.

That tube is on the cold side and it requires some care to avoid contamination problems.  Of course, the tubing is drained fully after each use.  I always recirculate either Starsan or Iodophor through the full pump/tubing/plate chiller/oxygen system prior to each wort transfer.  And every few brews, I also go through a full hot PBW recirculation.  If I see any buildup in the tubing, I replace it.  But, the cleaning regime seems to be keeping things visably clean and I've replaced the tubing about 2 times in about 5 years.  
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brun-Water/464551136933908

Offline tom

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1110
  • Denver, CO
    • View Profile
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2011, 10:12:20 AM »
Thanks Martin,

What type of hose and what inner diameter do you use?

Thanks again, Tom
Brew on

Offline rabid_dingo

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 787
  • Brighton, CO :D
    • View Profile
    • Mile High Monks
Re: In-line Oxygenation
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2011, 05:41:22 PM »
When you guys say "holes in the hose", are we talking needle pokes or something larger?

I used a small finishing brad and a lighter. Melted the holes in. I found that having several
brads and a pair of needle nose pliers worked best for me. Heat the brad and push through
the wall of the hose.  What I did was angle the holes in the direction of flow so that it had
less of a chance of spraying. Plus use a new brad for each hole. Trying to reuse the same
one embedded soot into the hose. Not worried about it yet but it doesn't look pretty.
Ruben * Colorado :)