Other than Brewing > All Things Food

Homemade Soap!

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tschmidlin:
Good stuff euge, thanks.

Ok, existing stick blender, find some lye somewhere, build a tube.  3" seems like a nice diameter for the soap, so I'll probably do the same.  re: thickness, I meant the ID of the tube, not the wall thickness, I can see I worded it poorly.

Re: the cap, you just press fit it on and then wrap it in plastic wrap?  Or does the plastic go on the inside?

The air valve, no worries about leaking because that is the top?  And as long as it is seated ok, when you apply pressure it just hold it against the top anyway?


--- Quote from: punatic on May 26, 2011, 12:06:43 AM ---I use liposuction fat cells to make my soap.   ;)

--- End quote ---
Nice reference. :)

euge:
Plastic on the outside, then wrapped with tape.

phillamb168:

--- Quote from: tschmidlin on May 26, 2011, 01:11:58 AM ---Good stuff euge, thanks.

Ok, existing stick blender, find some lye somewhere, build a tube.  3" seems like a nice diameter for the soap, so I'll probably do the same.  re: thickness, I meant the ID of the tube, not the wall thickness, I can see I worded it poorly.

Re: the cap, you just press fit it on and then wrap it in plastic wrap?  Or does the plastic go on the inside?

The air valve, no worries about leaking because that is the top?  And as long as it is seated ok, when you apply pressure it just hold it against the top anyway?


--- Quote from: punatic on May 26, 2011, 12:06:43 AM ---I use liposuction fat cells to make my soap.   ;)

--- End quote ---
Nice reference. :)

--- End quote ---

http://secure.sciencecompany.com/Sodium-Hydroxide-500g-P15962C670.aspx

phillamb168:
Euge you're like the crazy uncle I never had, teaching me all this cool stuff. Peppers, soap - it never ends! Fantastic thread. Thanks for all the how-to info.

I think I'll try spent-grain soap, but food processor'ed for a bit first to make it less 'sharp.' If I add some hop pellets, in theory they'll keep the grain from molding, no?

Mmm... tea tree oil, that's a good idea too. Tea tree oil and simcoe pellets.

tomsawyer:
Nice mold idea Euge.  I just made some small rectangular wooden trays for mine, I hold them together with clamps.  Gives me the rectangular bars this way.

One thing I would caution people about, is that the exothermic reaction during the saponification in the mold really generates a LOT of heat.  Just be aware and put your mold somewhere that it won't melt something or ruin a wood finish.  Also, you can't just substitute one oil for another in the recipe.  Different oils have different fatty acid compositions and as such you'll need a little more or less lye to do the job.  There are tables online that give you the amount of oil and lye for a given type.

As for 5% excess oils, this is a safe place to go but I find it to be a little much.  I will usually formulate a recipe using 3% excess.  That is enough to ensure no lye is left and makes the soap less oily feeling.  as it is the stuff is nice and slippery because you still have the glycerine in the soap, unlike commercial stuff where it is removed and sold as a separate commodity.

A tip on olive oil, it is expensive and canola is much cheaper and contains nearly the same fatty acid composition, namely mostly mono-unsaturated fats.  Makes a nice bar although as Euge says its softer than a recipe with something with a lot of saturated fat like lard.  When I was doing this a lot I used palm and coconut oils in some of my soap, as well as cocoa and shea butters.  Nice fancy stuff if you really want something for face washing, not needed for washing those crevies on the rest of the body.

There aree of course soapmaking forums you can learn a lot freom, just like brewing forums only not as interesting.

Euge, tell us about your experience with honey, sugar and milk.  I've made soap with milk and honey and it turned out nice.  I think the sugar/honey causes things to heat up even more right?

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