Author Topic: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale  (Read 5122 times)

Offline dannyjed

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Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« on: May 29, 2011, 07:19:18 AM »
I just picked some of this up and I was going to use it for a Scottish 70 and possibly for a IPA or IIPA.  I have never used this strain before and I was wondering if anyone could give me some idea of what to expect.  Any comments would be appreciated.
Dan Chisholm

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2011, 08:43:22 AM »
Clean yeast, works well at temps down to 50F.
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2011, 09:27:32 AM »
This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales.  Solid yeast, is otherwise clean,  I like it a lot.  As Denny said it performs well cool and can easily handle higher alcohols.

The hops in an IPA or IIPA will totally overpower any smoke so don't worry about that aspect.
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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2011, 08:15:21 PM »
I also like this yeast.
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Offline dannyjed

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2011, 07:21:42 AM »
Thanks- I think I will start out with a Scottish today and make a IIPA next.
Dan Chisholm

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2011, 08:04:09 AM »
I typically use it around 58F.  Worked well to ferment a very strong Scotch ale (1130-1140), so it can handle alcohol too.  I like it.
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Offline brewallday

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2011, 02:06:39 PM »
It worked really well for me in a rye pale ale.  The yeast lets the hops come through but still retains some maltiness in my experience with it.

Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2011, 02:37:50 PM »
This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales. 

This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2011, 03:16:50 PM »
This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales. 

This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

That's what I attribute it to, but Kris England (IIRC) has done some research relating it to the water used.
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Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2011, 11:07:06 PM »
This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

That's what I attribute it to, but Kris England (IIRC) has done some research relating it to the water used.

I could easily see it being a combination of water (minerally notes being taken as "earthy"), plus yeast strain (low levels of phenols, possibly plus earthy notes).

I'm just surprised that Greg Noonan missed this fact in his book "Scottish Ales."

Do anyone know the precise conditions which cause the yeast to produce earthy and/or smoky notes?

Offline darren

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2011, 10:49:42 AM »
Wouldn't it have something to do with the malting process?  Back 200 years ago, they would have used peat to fire the furnaces and kiln the grain.  All of the malt would have been slightly, but unintentionally, peat smoky, right?

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2011, 10:53:06 AM »
Wouldn't it have something to do with the malting process?  Back 200 years ago, they would have used peat to fire the furnaces and kiln the grain.  All of the malt would have been slightly, but unintentionally, peat smoky, right?

I'm not sure that's something that could be proven.  At least, I've never seen any solid evidence of it.
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Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2011, 11:44:47 PM »
Wouldn't it have something to do with the malting process?  Back 200 years ago, they would have used peat to fire the furnaces and kiln the grain.  All of the malt would have been slightly, but unintentionally, peat smoky, right?

By the early 19th century, improved indirectly heated kilns meant that malt didn't pick up (much) smoke character, regardless of the fuel used. Also, by that time, brewers were doing everything they could to avoid smoky character in their beer, since it was considered to be a fault. For example, in the early 18th century (~300 years ago), one of the reasons why porter was aged was to give time for the smoke character (from "blown" brown malt) to drop a bit.

That said, anything is possible. Locally-produced malt used for privately-brewed ("house brewed") beer could have had some peat character, but I can't imagine that the big Scottish breweries in Alloa, Edinburgh and elsewhere would have welcomed it.

More to the point, Scottish "shilling ales" and "wee heavy" are based on late 20th century examples. By that time, there was no way that Scottish brewers were using peat in their maltings, nor were they using water with a peat character in their brewing. It would be about as likely as one of the big Munich breweries "accidentally" using beechwood smoked rauchmalt in one of their lagers.

Offline thcipriani

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2011, 07:47:47 PM »
This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales. 

This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

That's what I attribute it to, but Kris England (IIRC) has done some research relating it to the water used.

I've seen that - here:
http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=45877&start=15

I just got back from Scotland and the water didn't have any sort of peat character that I could taste, although, admittedly, I didn't get much into the highlands. Caledonian and Belhaven had nothing I would call peaty - the were just clean, with a subdued caramel sweetness, they were dry and malt-forward beers. Jamil's Scottish recipe actually gets you pretty close. I have no idea where this idea originated - I just wish any reference to any smoke perception would get out of the guidelines. I hate judging this category and then in MBOS you get an "Other smoked beer" from the other side of the table.
Tyler Cipriani
Longmont, CO

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2011, 07:51:34 PM »
I just wish any reference to any smoke perception would get out of the guidelines.

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